7/18/2006

CHRISTOPH RUCKHÄBERLE

65 comments:

Painter said...

Lives and works in Leipzig, Germany

Cooky Blaha said...

my god painter has been duped into thinking they're a school too...how vast this magic conspiracy...how dark the con of mannnnnnn

kelli said...

Well there is a history to this. Minimalism was supported by a small group og collectors who funded DIA. AbEx was set up as an American art movement even though it included Europeans and owed a lot to Matta and others. I really only have love for the freaks like Warhol. More freaks please.

so clever and beautiful said...

I cannot figure out why you people have a problem with Leipzig. Admit it: painters are painting very good pictures there. Admit it: there are certain loose similarities between the artists. They might not go to a salon together and write manifestoes, but for G-d's sake, why must we deny the obvious? Even if these people don't even know one another, it is a true fact that they are FROM THE SAME CITY and are making paintings that will be remembered later. In some ways, later is the time that counts more than now.

Blog Warrior said...

Not so sure about how much will be 'remembered later.' We should have a Painter reunion on this one.

Cooky Blaha said...

I was being facetious.. I like this painting. Who set up ab-ex? please dont tell me the CIA

kelli said...

It was less of a created art movement than minimalism which really was funded and promoted by a few people. I meant that more in terms of the cultural zeitgeist of postwar America. This painting is fine. Still I like freaks better.

chicomacho said...

Yeah, its a school, certainly isn't a fucking movement! These guys make some cool paintings, but traditional as all hell so if they ARE a movement, I guess it would be a backwards movement! hmmm... the interior and landscape, wow this is groundbreaking shit, just like schutz, wow, political paintings, thats NEW! I can see why she is considered the possible greatest artist of her generation !!!!! BULLSHIT

Lets be honest, out of most of the leipzig painters, this guy is one of the weakest!

though, i sort of like this painting

zipthwung said...

"Every decoding is an encoding," so I'm asking why all the checker boards? Because as the man says "the sum of man is his inability to be alone in a silent room," and "every CIA mole has a hidden agenda in plain sight," and "it is not the thing you fear that you must fear, but the mother of the thing you fear," and tautologicly speaking - "mirrors leak light," so "lets have a war, and blame it on the middle class."


This monkey's gone to heaven, because the devil is 6, man is five, 11 is part of seven-eleven and I like nachos.
Can you dig it?

I like this painting, partly because "Pablo Picasso was never called an asshole, not like you."
But also, what do harlequins symbolize? I forget.

Who rides the pale horse?

burrito brother said...

hey man!
it takes a lot of guts to wear that vest with those knickers, never mind the argyle socks...

no-where-man said...

i find my self thinking fetish again. is it just me or does everything about Germany screams fetish?

kalm james said...

This painting isn’t “bad”. The question is why are we looking at it rather than something by the 150,000 other painters in Germany who are making “not bad” paintings? The brand “Leipzig Schule” is powerful now. Marketing and branding are probably more pertinent to what you can “see” than good painting.

Warhol was no freak, he was the consummate commercial artist, give the rubs what they want, slightly before they know they want it.

SCAB, there is no future babe, so you’d better like what you’re doing for yourself. Is that selfish and self-indulgent? Yeah, but painting is probably the most elitist, least understood, and obscure, not to mention anachronistic art form going. Just the perfect play-pen for intellectual snobs, present company excluded, (the foregoing said with only partial sarcasm intended).

The CIA didn’t set up the Ab-Exers but they certainly weren’t afraid to use them for their own purposes. They funded exhibitions, publications, and paid eminent critics to travel and curate shows that would promote America’s great cultural tolerance and diversity.

There are no coincidences in the art world, it only seems that way to the uninitiated. Don’t peal back the mask to far, you might not like what you’ll find.

Cooky Blaha said...

ooh shit KJ got it like thaat:::!

dkweeeed said...
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dkweeeed said...
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dkweeeed said...
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poppy said...

i can see some of the metaphysical painters in this fellows work (this work and others)- i quite fuckn like it...
you know the stuff we look at in history books and think is ugly as all hell?
i love what this painter embraces.. KELLI- if warhol is a freak, who were his freak buddies?

whoever said it was right about movements and what happens under the surface that many people dont know about.. the politics behind moves etc.. Jackson Pollock

Movement-- i wouldn't call something that just because a tone is being set

Palooka said...

I like this one, it's weirdness factor is a more keyed-up then a lot of his work. And I do think there is a fetish-thing going on w/ a lot of German work. This piece certainly seems to have it. What do you expect from such an emotionally repressed people? Good music, lofty thoughts and recently a fair amount of damn good painting.

kelli said...

Poppy that's sort of my point. What Warhol did was radical and strange. I think it's a mistake to view him as a commercial artist because he fits into fine art traditions of political art and also an American sublime ( Inness ) but then made it into something new. I just think his work had more pathos than other pop artists and calling him a freak is a compliment.I guess there are different kinds of artists but the problem with schools is there are a few leaders and a lot of followers. I don't know which this artist is. Maybe it is too soon to tell with this group.

closeuup said...

Funny how all u NYers like the Germans. I can't say I like--or understand--any of it. I like all theEnglish, though.

Anyway, with this painting, note the Western landscape in the distance. Everytime I go to the Southwestern desert, its crawling with Germans. They take their loooong vacations out here. They rent Harleys, and Biker costumes and horses, and do a Wild West thing. Kind of a Paris, Texas thing? I hate that movie.

Cooky Blaha said...

I think Germany is one of the vanguards for contemporary art now. Asides from painting, some of the the best photographers working right now are German as well

burrito brother said...

echhh! who cares about photography?

poppy said...

hi kelli
i knew freak was compliment... like saying we're such dorks but we like being dorks..
the thing about 'freak' is i think of it as having a certain sense of irrationality.. and warhol i believe to be the most rational artist around at the time... if he wasn't rational, he could never have been perceived of as a freak.

Cooky Blaha said...

Some of these struths were powerful in a painterly way.

online they look crappy


Ruff does nice stuff sometimes
too vapid for ya?.

closeuup said...

In Andy's day--being a "freak" could get u killed. Like being a woman in Pakistan today.

Lasciate Ogni Speranza said...

This was one of the artists I heard talk, who said :

"There is no Leipzig School..."

...and that there are plenty of painters in Germany who paint abstractly, terribly, etc... For some reason it was thought by some people at the talk that if your German, you have some academic background gene... not the case as he pointed out....He was a very soft spoken and sincere artist...

zipthwung said...

whats not to like?

zipthwung said...

I heard UCLA was too cool for school in 1997. How about UCLA vs Leipzig?
Spin it.

kelli said...

I heard Phillip Pearlstein talk once and two things stuck out. He said Warhol was doing all commercial work ( he illustrated some Truman Capote too) and the other artists they knew looked down on him and thought of him as naive and crass. Pearlstein was kind of dismissive. The second thing was he was totally jealous. I guess I just respect idiosyncratic people more than the whole "company man" approach.
Somebody brought up the idea that this whole school of painting looks traditional as though it skipped parts of 20th century art. That was interesting. Could anybody
articulate what it skips?

no-where-man said...

Warhol was in love with Truman and the drawings were love letters to him, later they were to have a relationship - but only because of his art, His work was almost all of this sort. - is freak a stand it for Fag on this blog?

zipthwung said...

If this work was done by someone in indiana it wouldnt get a second glance. The idea that the artists are unschooled, or are imitating a naive style, deliberately, and that this is somehow interesting, because they are Germans from Leipzig is interesting.

If the Leipsigers are advocating a certain loss of memory, I could go along with that. History is a burden. I don't know all the US presidents, and after the Rapture, will anyone need to know?

Maybe we should all go back to 1934 when art was easier to remember.

"In a series of articles written from 1989 to this year, Cal Arts, UCLA, and the Art Center College of Design have been singled out: beginning with Ralph Rugoff's "Liberal Arts" published in Vogue in 1989 about Cal Arts; to Dennis Cooper's "Too Cool for School," which was published in the music magazine Spin in 1997, about UCLA, to "Surf and Turf" by Andrew Hultkrans published in Artforum in 1998 about UCLA and Art Center; to Deborah Solomon's New York Times magazine article on "How to Succeed in Art" from 1999."

poppy said...

yes you are right
most people would spend their time playing catch-up!
when straying far from the norm you can be either extremely rational or completely insane.. My earlier definition was one sided.. A little of both in my cup of tea please

kelli said...

Thanks No-Where. I've always wondered about the Capote drawings

zipthwung said...

Whenever I look at a Pearlstein I can allways hear myself wondering what its supposed to make me feel or think, but I never come up with anything. But also, with a Robert Ryman I never come up with anything either. Sort of refreshing, like cheese.

closeuup said...

"straying from the norm, idiosyncratic, elitist snobs"

these are choices. real freaks have no choice

kelli said...

Oh and the whole idea that Warhol, Johns and Rauchenberg had a "camp" or "subversive" aesthetic as a subtle way of saying gay was not what I meant. I don't think it's insignificant but it marginalizes their work. I was pointing to Warhol as someone who stood out from all the sheeplike people doing AbEx 10 or 20 years after it was over. Well I guess some people are still heating up those leftovers today.
Is that one of the historical moments this painting skips?

JpegCritic said...

How 'bout Dresden vs Leipzig?
The Havekost, Scheibitz and Knobloch, Nitsche et al..
Someone wrote of a distinction between
the two -- social-realism vs camp or kitch. Or perhaps
Dresden operates within wider historical frames
of reference.

Also, there was a nyt mention months ago mentioning
Leipzig as the new Williamsburg? Cheap rent for gallery
space and studios?

Cooky Blaha said...

zip I think that comment about Indiana is bs..I would be interested in these last two paintings regardless of where they came from. When I first saw Christoph's work, because it was in LFL I first associated it with Schutz and thought he was American,... as they were some similarities in their acerbic choices. He immediately held my attention without knowing his background.
Regarding Loy's seemingly meandering perception of art history,..its a hard quality to pin down. I think it has something to do with her painthandling, which appears quite unselfconscious in its technique, even if her narratives and figuration can be heavyhanded. There is a hint of PIcabia to it, but that reference may or may not be present, as opposed to someone like 80s salle where you could really feel the distance between painter and markmaking.
With Christoph, his particular dialogue feels more contemporary and "hot". I kind of see a relation to someone like Anselm Reyle, ..contemporary artists who gain inspiration from the failings/paradoxes of modernism. Christoph series of oceanic(?) masks are interesting in this sense, with their exploration of colonial formalism and all that jazzzzz

no-where-man said...

i am not sure but i think i got that out of "The Life and Death of Andy Warhol: Books: Victor Bockris" i can look it up later - madonna tonight!

i see your point but i do think it is significant that they were gay, lovers and worked in the commercial field in an aesthetic mode that informed there work. It may have = marginalisation from the matcho academic gallery art world but it ment day to day contact with people in other creative fields like fashion, music and film.

it is not easy to stay viable in a commercial capacity while maintaining personal idenity and in Warhols case baby-sitting a den of dilettantes collaborators and junkeys. - i am sure it would have been far "easier" to just paint.

Cooky Blaha said...

@ kelli, its very cheesy to say this but when I see the drips in this painting I kind of get an immediate acknowledgement of ab-ex, at least that the artist has mulled over it at one point....
goes without saying that that's not what this painting is about. In Loy's and Rauch's works you dont see these kind of drips I think

zipthwung said...

youre right cookie, John Mellencamp has something going on.

kelli said...

I guess I'm thinking of the Finch review of Johns where he used it to dismiss him. I'm all for both queer and feminist readings of art history. Last bit of geek trivia: Florentiner was German slang for gay in the Renaissance. Speaking of which:
http://www.gayheroes.com/leonangel.htm

dkweeeed said...
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epilepticadam said...

there are lots of drips in Matisse's Dance and other works, take a look at it at the MOMA...ruckhaberle acknowledges matisse...

epilepticadam said...

i thinks it done well overall, not to my taste though. there is something static about it despite the drips/layers of drips. the drips are seperate from the people and the paint within the people... its done well overall, i'm just tired of the 'naive'ish thing...i'd like a pair of those socks...

laydownsally said...
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Cooky Blaha said...

zip whats your point? that painting is atrocious..worse than the M Davis they had in the Whitney.

JpegCritic said...

I think it's the centrality/symmetry
of this image lends to a kind stasis
that is disappointing. R is one of my
favs, but not this painting. The devices
are all there to make it, but I think he's
more talented as a designer what this
image intimates. His paintings of groups
are very well designed indeed!

The half-standing-half-walking horse
with the guys legs mirroring the hind
legs of the horse a little interest, but
it's like a formal one-liner. The tail and
the head-- what does this symmetry
symbolize?

zipthwung said...

cooky, This is a deliberately bad or kitchy painting - the bombastic circus sideshow swath of ultramarine blue kind of clues me in. THen theres the Picaso/vintage harlequin imagery, the susan "bad painter" rothenberg/picaso horse (a clusterfuck of references)blue period etecetera, who cares.

But I can dig it. I also like John "cougar" meloncamp and Paul "melonhead" McCartney, because they seem to share the sack to paint badly, although maybe not deliberately so. I don't know them so I can't tell for sure, but they have coffee table books out right?

"I realize that there are probably hundreds of people who deserve to have a book of their paintings published before I do, but because of my celebrity I've been given this great opportunity to show off my 'hobby' and, in turn, make money for charity. It isn't about how great I think I am at paining or music, but rather a reminder to people how great it can feel to just try."
-- John Mellencamp

Isnt that sweet?

Martin said...

i wasn't into this painting at all either, but liked the last show very much, much more than the earlier stuff i saw in the leipzig show at mass moca.

i liked the dirtiness.

epilepticadam said...

jpeg critic,

what painters do you think compose well when handling more than one figure and dealing with a background, middleground and all?

so many art historical paintings deal with 'balance' whether chaotic or ordered...but both are valid...

epilepticadam said...

to add to what i mentioned -this work, for being of the orderly type of composition, is too simple for my taste too... to clarify: it is executed well...

Cooky Blaha said...

I completely don't think this is a deliberately bad painting. The kitsch reference is done in a very subtle and roundabout manner: by using the Harlequin, he suggests its (and other modernist cliches') degeneracy into kitsch after the effects of history. This is however a very solid painting formally, and one that obviously took a lot of skill, foresight and intelligence to make. Because of this, I think one can sense an attraction and repulsion to his subject, so I think its wrong to label it distinctly to one side; it kind of doesn't give it enough credit. Hes obviously fascinated by exploring this specific aesthetic
I also dont think this is his best work
And sure, mellencamp and Mcartney make paintings, but did you know Swizz Beats studies under Peter Max?
jjiiggaaaaaa

JpegCritic said...

E,
I think that compostion-as-design is ultimately
subjective -- depending on what the viewer is into.
When it comes to viewing paintings with small groups
of people, I get off on the innovative dynamic
arrangements of the flat two dimensional shapes --
When an artist manages to balance patternmaking with
the mimetic problem of having subjects occupy 3d space,
me likey. Degas comes to mind with small groups. Balthus'
frieze-like groups seem to use the 2nd-dimension as
a psychological stage. Piero della Francesca, the same.
I'd put 15th cent indian miniatures in there for the
impressive pattern makeing, but they don't seem to
have the same psychological space as the former.
Of the contemporaries, I like adam adach's gropings
of people; Kaye Donachie does really well; But especially
Ruckhäberle, who's pattern like treatment of painting
does indeed remind me of Matisse (2nd to Balthus).

While the historical artist most referred-to when it
comes to people and compostion would be Poussin,
I never got him. That whole balance thing -- perhaps
I never really paid attention.

dkweeeed said...
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epilepticadam said...

thanks for clarifying jpeg,

i agree with what you state, i am not keen on how he uses pattern, its feels decorative to me ...

i think what your articulating is in sync with the 'boringness' i alluded to. the artists you mentioned use space in a more complex way, which is what i would actually equate to great design. if ruckhaberle were a designer, i'd say he'd be a very safe conservative designer- does the job well and reliable, even predictable- but he would not be a great designer...

not sure what you don't get about pousinn and i think baltus is much better and interesting imagery-wise.

i also think this was not his best piece in the show...but i'd still characterize his work the same way...

JpegCritic said...

I think he's really playful with pattern.

But perhaps its's just me likin the panty flashes.

But fair enough. Each to his own.

JpegCritic said...

Hmm is this thing working?

poppy said...

the tension in this painting comes from some areas of dead weight - around feet etc..face of boy on horse etc...- seems to be trying to bring more light into his work with this painting but is still using deadpan skintones from previous designy type work.. shouldn't be too hard to fix:0
that my schoolyard critique.

JpegCritic said...

Let's not forget the tension in the horse.

dkweed, here's a tip on getting this one
to canter for you.

"...relax your hips and move them with the motion. Imagine your hips going in a circle, instead of moving your whole body, just allow your hips to rock back and forth with the motion. Don't force your hips to gyrate either, most horses will match pace with the movement of your body..."

cha said...

I see it on a biscuit tin lid... and yes, nice light in part...

no-where-man said...

oh fuck finch. thats what makes him shitty. we used to be friends untill he told me he had to "throw out one of my dvd'd for being to gay". like thx - great review. ill just take the gay out. thats possible.

beadelog said...

I went to school at a German University for a while and most of the artists were middle aged career students who got a stipend from the government to simply produce. The work was pretty damn good but was missing the capitalistic zeal that gets the collectors in a frenzy. It again could have been the cheap Afghani hash that kept them from scholarly collusion. Anyway, although the work is kind of boring its good to see that they've got it together in Leipzig.

kelli said...

That's obviously awful No-Where. Some people suck all the sex out of art history and replace it with gender. Laura Mulvey cleaned up Foucault and we all accept it as gospel. Don't clean anything up. Throw that one out. Jpeg: that was a really good statement.

poppy said...

toungue in cheek - schoolyard critique!
over
out