7/11/2006

Chantal Joffe

34 comments:

Painter said...

Great Britain

zipthwung said...

I like my art edgy, not whimsical. Anyone see steve mumfords docu-colors in harpers? What if he painted in this style? It would be better, sort of.

Cooky Blaha said...

a lot of these posts seem to make the case against using photography like this in painting...

closeuup said...

Painter has quite a sense of humor with the juxtaposition of these paintings. Princess, Mother and child, Profane, sacred, indeed.

closeuup said...

or you could compare this to the Hockney. the Brits love to wrestle with their penchant for domesticity and comfort--why do i hear souxie souix singing happy house in my head?--

no-where-man said...

photography to paint then to pixels i like my cud chewed ;)

all screams 'vulerbility'

zipthwung said...

I dunno I do find this MILF alluring. Could put the kid on the barby.

clement said...

question for Kalm James,

You had quoted Tworkov a few blogs back and I am wondering if you have any book titles concerning Tworkov that you would recommend?

thanks,

poppy said...

How would this painting be better if the MILF and child were painted from life rather than from photo?

closeuup said...

you could put the kid on the barbie--or tony blair could

Look into that eye and see if youd like to try

vulnerability?

kalm james said...

Hey clement,
While doing some deep research I did come across a catalog of his work with s few quotes from a solo show that I think took place at ether the Whitney or the Gugg back in 60-61. Irving Sandler quotes liberally from him in “The New York School: American Painting and Sculpture from the 1950s",--- "American Art of the 1960’s", as well as in his recent memoir "A Sweeper up after Artists". These guys were all part of that 10th Street milieu that formed around de Kooning and Rosenberg, members of "the club" etc. For anyone with an interest in the history of New York’s art scene during the last half century Sandler’s the man.

no-where-man said...

hum closeup i asked the brits about what you said and one said

"We are basically a polite caring people,all nations s have there thugs, we are not all like them however,we like to do our gardening, take the dog for a walk have a pint at the local pub, play a game of darts, watch our cricket, and football on tv, get out of the way when the inlaws come round to dinner, pretend you are having a heart atack when the family album comes out, on Sunday we like tinkering with the car,never comment when the wife or girl-friend has her hair done,we stop at the zebra crossing to let old people cross, probably the only country in the world to do so!Yes we are a great people, we used to have a great country until the liberals took it over,we are kind and considerate, only the other day as I wos driving my car down the road, a driver wanted direction s as he passed me he shouted out Leatherhead, I then shouted back Fish-Face, yes we are tolerant, and considerate when its Saturday night we lads always take a packet of asprin to bed just in case the wife has a headache, oh yes we are just plain lovely folk."

the brits are glib.

something i read said they looked powerful i disagree i see vulerbility, in process, material this unaware unsuspecting baby, naked women bent over admid 'protecting glare meeting our gaze' also naked still protecting her private bits from 'our' the 'cameras?' view,

kalm james said...

Clement,
Oops! Minor correction: Tworkov’s show was at the Whitney in 1964. I believe the catalog essay was by Sam Hunter. He’s been written about in “Black and White Are Colors,” by Rackstraw Downes, “From Foreign Shores” by Goodrich and Baur, and had reviews published by Barbara Rose, Irving Sandler, and Calvin Tomkins. Sandler implies that when he took over the painting department at Yale from Albers, Tworkov got the students to refocus their view from their navels to the New York art market.

zipthwung said...

Modern love is automatic

millerhuggins said...

Zipyhwung, is that a young Julian Schnabel?

closeuup said...

Brits R Us.

It's Raushenberg- is that his wife?

no-where-man said...

speaking of the brits, my roomates realy want to throw a party this summer so i was thinkin close-up as you recall well of trying the whole internet Art curation again, the idea came up on the Saatchi Forum today... you should check it out it is a robust site.

zipthwung said...

(*)

closeuup said...

should i send a drawing of a bottle of tequila?

clement said...

Thanks Kalm J,
The only book I have of Tworkov is Jack Tworkov: Paintings 1928-1982.

brian edmonds said...

For some reason i like Chantal a bit more than most of those that paint in her vain. I think shes a notch below Marlene Dumas. What do you all think of Dumas? She is overrated but nothing like a little T-n-A in your artwork.

closeuup said...

Dumas is brilliant and not a bit overrated.

Do we have to choose between emotion and irony, or can we have it all?

no-where-man said...

lol ! closeup ;)


i think irony has become emotional.

zipthwung said...

Dunno, but try to get some esthetic distance before you drop the napalm.

Cooky Blaha said...

1st thing I thought was 2 notches below Dumas

Dumas doesnt really float my boat though

closeuup said...

Me too, no-wear-man. Me too.

I only drop the naplam in the personal sphere, but I can really clear the room.

and the personal still is political

Cooky Blaha said...

oh yeah and didnt rikrit say something in an Art Now book along the lines that "irony leads the way to new metaphors"

maybe it wasnt him, but I always wondered about the specific meaning of that

wade said...

25,000 pounds in prize money for one of these bad boys... I must be doing something wrong, or maybe I should just gouge my eyeballs out now.

Think I'll go write a script for "trading places" meets "art school confidential".

cha said...

About working from photos...does anyone know about copyright?

zipthwung said...

"Jeff Koons, a famous artist, found the picture on a postcard and wanted to make a sculpture based on the picture for an art show on the theme of banality of everyday items. After removing the copyright label from the post card, he gave the picture to his assistants with instructions on how to model the sculpture. He asked that as much detail be copied as possible, though the puppies were to be made blue, their noses exaggerated, and flowers to be added to the hair of the man and woman.

The sculpture, entitled "String of Puppies," became a success, and Koon sold three of them for $367,000.

Upon discovering that his picture had been copied, Rogers sued Koons and the Sonnabend Gallery for copyright infringement. Koons admitted to having intentionally copied the image but attempted to claim fair use by parody.

here

cha said...

OK, so work from your own photos!! or have the best lawyers.........

millerhuggins said...

I do like the work...Alice Neel Lite...The painting falls apart, quickly, without that grid behind them...soupish color, strong grid, works.

westguy3 said...

so glad i don't live in NY, seems horridly unfriendly.

ha!

this is paltry as if distortion is the make-up of the day. wasn't this done to death already in the 80's.

oh, it's retro.

dkweeeed said...

yes, alice neel