7/24/2006

Aya Takano

105 comments:

Painter said...

Aya Takano lives and works in Kyoto, Japan

no-where-man said...

little boy was a great show however super flat has been knocked off so much that even the good stuff is lookin tired, 2 many eyeprints from being overshown.

painterdog said...

I agree the cute flatness thing...
Takano was(is)part of Takashi Murakami's drones.
That man is a marketing genus.
I'm crazy about his work its nice eye candy, but man hes really smart.

Yoshitomo Nara's work is a lot more interesting in that it deconstructs the whole cute thing.

Trevor Brown is a british artist/illustrator living in Tokyo whos work is realy on the edge.
If you have issues with erotic art who's cotent is pushing many buttons, you might be offended by his work.

His wife(www.hippiecoco.net)makes cute one off teddy bears.

ec said...

Looks Dargeresque, more finesse in the drawing and color than in Little Boy and the show at Boesky last year. But I wish the world were more complicated for this artist, seeing all the little space figures seems so...not diverse. I have the same complaint about the British bloke. Is the world really so cute? NO!

ec said...

Looks Dargeresque, more finesse in the drawing and color than in Little Boy and the show at Boesky last year. But I wish the world were more complicated for this artist, seeing all the little space figures seems so...not diverse. I have the same complaint about the British bloke. Is the world really so cute? NO!

painterdog said...

let me rephrase that:
I'm not crazy about his work(Takashi Murakami) its nice eye candy, but man hes really smart.

closeuup said...

one thing that Japanese never are is awkward. She has brought a lot of awkwardness into this painting, so things are changing? or just a pastiche of western influence?

wade said...

The book Drop Dead Cute has some "awkward" female japanese artists. Some have pop imagery or child/adolescent imagery, style etc. Examples are:

Makiko Kudo, Ryoko Aoki, Yuiko Hosoya

Amazon has table of contents.

wade said...

This promotional exhibit--includes a couple of them, and has some other interesting things.

http://mymoleskine.typepad.jp/myartist/

brian edmonds said...

Strage japanamation. I want to know how you all feel about this artist, Chris Scarborough. He uses japanamation as a starting point for what he does. He has started generating a lot of attention as of late.
http://www.scarboy.net/

Cooky Blaha said...

this whole vein of expression is extremely limited. the only interest I can see in this style is from a sociological vantage point of the genre, besides that you just have to like "that extremely specific way" of drawing everything.
Murakami is bad for contemporary Japanese art

painterdog said...
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painterdog said...
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painterdog said...

Chris Scarborough:
Some of his work is kind of creepy.
Its trying to hard to be kitsch.
The more realistic work is much better at the bottom of his thumbnail page.
Still its also illustrative which is not bad, although I can tell he went to Savannah College of Art and Design and sure enough he did.

kelli said...

Art versions of Japanimation, hentai and cartoon imagery in general have something in common. They are less interesting than the originals and quickly seem dated.
Two words: Wicked City

JpegCritic said...

Ha!

Cooky Blaha said...

some of the people who are related to this vein that I like:
Tim Lokiec at LFL
Yayoi Deki at ATM, though the stuff atm has isnt that good

I nominate Yayoi Kusama as the best contemporary Japanese artist. opinions?

Martin said...

i like makoto aida.

kelli said...

Kusama!

cha said...

another vote for aida

ducktalez said...

who's the artist that did the caterpillar fuck doll picture?
thing about Aida is a lot of people do the bizarre hentai metaphor thing. not a big difference in my mind btwn aida's crippled sex object and murakami's early spaceship sex object

Martin said...

aida does a lot of different stuff, no single medium or subject - except maybe picking at society.

no-where-man said...

this thread reads as a very western pov.

kelli said...

I like Aida except it seems like he has two totally different bodies of work. Disturbing erotic work and the political work about war or the homeless or whatever issue he is examining. If the two things came together it would be amazing. Erotic horror or rough justice.

Martin said...

it does come together. mutant hanako. and that disturbing work i think is probably more political than erotic.

and he does more - painting, photos, performance type stuff, installation.

kelli said...

It seems like his work is always about power relations in some way but I still think the two types of work are seperate. It seems like merging the two (the political and the erotic) is something art could do in a way that japanimation or hentai does not do as consciously. Or maybe it does? It's true this is all from a Western point of view.

no-where-man said...

political + erotic

Cooky Blaha said...
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Cooky Blaha said...

if this audience had an "eastern pov" would that make this painting any better?

kelli said...

No-where that is 10 kinds of wrong I can't spell. I still think art could do it better if we weren't all busy making the same show 5 times and selling it at art fairs.

no-where-man said...

whats wrong?,
i just think (and am only talking from slightly over hearing japanese friends) that the notion of the "bizarre hentai metaphor thing" is a pretty surfacy read. - did anyone see little boy?

kelli said...

the image you posted. disturbing in art is often good.

no-where-man said...

i thought it refered towards the duel nature of the message within the "little boy" title while acknowledging the primal fetishitsic nature behind such power and the erotic.

kelli said...

I've read a little about the way some critics connect Hiroshima and Nagasacki and sexual violation in Japanimation. What do other people think?
I 've seen a lot of cutesy art which is less hard than some of the comic/animation imagery.

Cooky Blaha said...

I buy it, also with strains of it coinciding with feelings of being neutered after the war, among countless other things.

however a lot of this stuff has definite precedence in their art

yoshitoshi has a lot of over the top rape/necrophilia stuff.




even Hokusai did the erotic monster thing.

no-where-man said...

PERSISTENCE OF A GENETIC SCAR
Japanese Anime, Manga, and Otaku Culture Fill an Open National Wound

esotericaesthetic said...

Can't help thinking... Art Bell meets Darger.

wade said...

Graphic eroticism in japanese art goes back much further and I don't see the connection with The Bomb. (vs. Godzilla or some more obvious monster movie stuff).

Forget Western pov about aesthetics but about sexual culture, I could see there being a divide.

cha said...

very Darger....
What's the central white top figure?

wade said...

That is a mother cloud spirit guiding the confident guy in underoos astride the toothy dragon...

wade said...

I think the reading of, say, extra large dicks and octopus cunnilungus as some sort of expression of repressed pain is typically western...

Let's see. We have religion and then the market(and sub-markets or sub-cultures)forming our fetishes, guiding our desire towards this or that object. While we share much a bit of market culture with the Japanese I think there is still quite a religious and cultural divide. (Shintoism vs. Christianity, Japanese lunch box vs. the brown bag).

cha said...

ok so it's a sex-hat... in a science fiction story.

Personal or cultural symbolism?!

esotericaesthetic said...
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JpegCritic said...

Having trouble reading your point wade. I don't know
Shinto. Whereas 'repression' via religion, the market,
a culture or any other social construct is generally
seen as a Freudian definition and thereby Western thru
extension, my feeling is that it prob existed before Freud
and is thus more global.

Given that manga and surrounding histories include
Disney (notably Fantasia) as part of it's list of
influences, it's difficult to draw a hard line between
eastern and western. Like Voodoo and Christianity,
where does one start and the other begin? Cultural
symbolism or global symbolism? How about Fusion
Symbolism? A California roll played backwards?

Fetishes. These are fetishes, by virture of being art
in this particular market. By virture of being
presented in galleries and on this blog. Of course that
is again, a Freudian viewpoint, yada yada....

And so what's the alternate pov? The pov that excises
the western from said fusion -- or perhaps fusion is
part of Shinto? dunnno. Sex, monsters, and sex-monsters:
I'm interested in reading a 'reading' that can
circumvent Freud or American War (wasn't Fantasia was
recognized as a war film by the time Japan got to it?)
while having kick-ass sex and monsters.

Kick-Ass Sex and Monsters!

Professor Mouth said...

Jesus, this site is as boring as ever. I think you stupid fuckers have found the critical mass of boringness.

JpegCritic said...

Mouth! At Last! What are you wearing?
Spaghetti straps? Yeah I'm bored too!

JpegCritic said...

Cmon, man, I've been hittin refresh over and over and over
again, and still no sign of your octapussy! Aaaiiiit! I'm going to sleep.

no-where-man said...

sublimated desire, fear and Art as the fetish object is never boring for me, however does this piece really turn me on , well no - would it have 13 years ago, - for sure. i think this style being knocked off from everything from advertising to second rate american "in the style" of cartoons makes it hard to swallow circa 2006, perhaps as the "trend " dies down the cream will rise.

painterdog said...

no-where-man, have you been to Japan?

no-where-man said...

nope not my thing. but between the animators and djs it has been all around for the last 13 yrs. (before it broke into the mainstream) it was what i was watching when not painting fruit.. for beter or worse.

pilost said...

takano is beautiful.

kelli said...

It's true Wade: reading this sort of tortured and repressed tragic subtext is very Freudian. People often fall back on Freudian and Lacanian pschychoanalysis without thinking much about the very specific culture which produced Freud.
What would Jessica Benjamin make of Japanimation?
There are a lot of "interpenetrating bisexual subjects"

zipthwung said...

dude,

simething about this blog that brings out the modern language asociation (MLA) in me.

I don't buy the whole "the bomb infantilized a large sector of the japanese psyche" dealio. THat in itself seems infantilizing.

I don't claim to understand the obsession with cuteness - other than scale, because Japan is a small country and space is at a premium. Thats why their technology is so tiney, not like my 1970's solid state Technics receiver. Thats more my thing.

Japanese design has been "revere engineered" for quite some time, most recently by broadcast and web designers - my point being whats the dealio yo?

Sign me,

Blue Steel (I got mine, you got yours, lets make lots of money)

wade said...

Boring is underated.
Jpeg, I was trying to say that the visual cultures via the commercial market have come togther, so we read the aesthetics easily, but the cultural context is different. The japanese are still weird.

painterdog said...

I have to say my wife is Japanese and we have talked about this a fair amount.
That article was interesting but kind of off base. The flatness thing is part of their art history, just look at ukiyo-e prints and you can see the the same esthetic.

The modern cute thing is all from anime. Its just part of the escaping from the rigid culture that they are brought up in.

Kind of off the subject, but if anyone goes to Japan and visits Hiroshima you have got to go to one of the pancake places, its cheap amazing eats, and they cook it on this grill about 3 inches from you. you can eat it off the grill! But the give you a plate.

no-where-man said...

i feel it was on base as any over arching curitoral statment can ever be.. it was at the Japan society so someone must of been into it, but hey they also release DR9 there first, just got an invite to this group, - i assume from thread - looks good if anyone is into anime sorry if this is creating an anime oxbow the work of Takano goes beyond this for me... if you like it you may want to check out "After the Reality" we enjoyed it.
July 06 — August 12, 2006
76 Grand St. & 18 Wooster St.

poppy said...

japanese weird?
the west has been fascinated with japanese and eastern cultures for quite some time.. I guess we like weird things.
How does everybody feel about Japanese automobiles?
those cheap bastards, are cheapening our vehicles..am i right am i right?
we make even crappier clones..

painterdog said...

poppy are you trying to be funny?

wade said...

My car was built in Hiroshima, it's almost like being there!

painterdog said...

it does not have the pancakes! you have to go their for the pancakes.
Of course the museum will most likely ruin your day, so eat before or a few days after.

Also the ruins with all the origami swans is very beautiful.

poppy said...

is this blog for serious painters only?
if it is i'm in the wrong place,
i don't know anything about cars..
i'm a serious painter just not a "serious" painter.
to be serious though i don't think japanese are weird people or place even.
Miss Universe 1st runner up was from Japan - she should have won.. Let's change the topic to this instead.. Like LoudMouth said, topic is boring, put up some good paintings please, stop trying to get us to discuss the issues surrounding paintings that aren't worth discussion- like the lame watercolour at the top!

kalm james said...

Hey gang, hate to sound harsh but this piece looks like someone’s formula of a what’s-happen-now painting. One part Japanese anime, two parts Henry Darger weird little girls on a vendetta, one part kinky sexual imagery throw in a dash of naïve animal pictures and a twist of the grotesque, not to forget the little space alien, mix in cross cultural blender at frappe setting and, voila, Tokyo two step cocktail. This looks like watercolor and I like the handling but wish the artist would boil the references down to a more essential state. What’s with the victimization status that’s constantly being applied to everyone? As for Easter vs. Western aesthetics, unless you were born and raised in the “East” you can only experience those views as a tourist, the “pancake house” version. Poppy’s right this infatuation with the “Eastern” is just another fashion that’s been repeated since eighteenth century France’s fad of mixing Rococo with “Orientalism.”

Jp’critic thanks for your recommendation of the Raphael Rubenstein article, good stuff.

For those interested in hard core “old school” abstraction, drop by PS1 and catch the Ron Gorchov show. Great selection of pieces from the late 70s and stuff from the last four years. Admittedly his curved stretchers are a signature gimmick, but they do seem to have some kind of primordial rightness for smearing paint on.

millerhuggins said...

Talk about painting, Poppy...go right ahead. Tell us why this painting is lame...be specific...what led you to this conclusion.

poppy said...

I'll say one or two things -
you could get me to like almost anything if it is aesthetically pleasing.. i can be a sucker for that.. looking at it minus the subject matter and it is a haphazard smearing of translucent washes. why is this not an issue for anyone? Esp the piece of dirt below, bad teenage poetry at its worst. Nobody needs conceptual/historical background information on utter shit, period.

zipthwung said...

theres something strange in the neighborhood...

shynola!

and shit.

no-where-man said...
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painterdog said...

kalm james
first the pancake place is for locals and my wifes family comes form Hiroshima. You don't see tourist in these places because they don't know about them. Don't insult people when you don't know what your talking about.

Second I have relitives in Japan and have been here many times so my experience is not that of a tourist.

You can be western and embrase eastern culture, just like people form asia can embrace our western culture.

Yes its foreign to us but I feel like a foreigner in Kentucky as I'm not from the south.

painterdog said...

Poppy your right this artists work is pretty bad, and she got to her exulted position because of Takashi Murakami who she worked for.

cha said...

poppy... if we were "serious" painters, would we have time to blog?

and discussing "bad" painting is as valid as discussing "good" painting? interesting points come out of both aspects.

poppy said...

here i am not painting again,..
i just wanted to hear that it sucked..
and i want to see something good..
pretty please?

GrandmaNelly said...

"What’s with the victimization status that’s constantly being applied to everyone?"
kalm James I am wonder what you mean by this. I guess I as a women I may read it a bit different. I think these are really personal works and so it maybe that the artist has had an experience that she was victimized most women have in some form or fashion I see these as a response to being female and all that brings.

zipthwung said...

i saw a lot of really personal work in high school. Less so in undergrad. By grad school the personal work had metamorphosed into a butterfly, flying into the fan of time, hubris unchained, free of the glass, a three headed homunculous of infinite sublimation, or the opposite, a thri-coloned shit machine, a fatted calf pregnant with an infinitude of clones. I could go on, ad nauseum.

zipthwung said...

only rock n' roll can free me

kelli said...

So much art is like a gang bang between Henry Darger, Hans Christian Andersen and Hello Kitty. But less sexy.

millerhuggins said...

personal works inevitably need to speak a language...The works are inevitably judged on the quality of language not in how personal.

millerhuggins said...

My favorite art gang bang....hmmm?

no-where-man said...

the hockney on this site "friends" is in the smithsonian this month good article. "he likes to paint people he knows"

mr.wakeup said...

People do not know themselves...and if they do, they cannot express it... for many reasons...

no-where-man said...

maybe that is what Art is the never ending process of trying to know.

mr.wakeup said...

Sincere thought and true No Where Man; but I do not believe many people are capable of expressing what they feel/logically conjure...

no-where-man said...

is your alias, if i may call you wakeup, a nod to this?

mr.wakeup said...

No Where,
I do not understand your statement...
As mentioned I agree with your thoughts...


....

mr.wakeup said...

No Where,
I do not understand your statement...
As mentioned I agree with your thoughts...
....

zipthwung said...

Gurdjieff dude, we all want to know.

"Gurdjieff said that people live their lives in a form of waking sleep, and that higher levels of consciousness are possible. In developing the inner possibility of becoming more aware of ourselves in our daily lives, one is shown a fresh way of living which can enrich our experience of life, and our feeling of ourselves alive. 'Know thyself' takes on a more organic meaning rather than an intellectual pursuit. "

I dunno. What is I? I think therefore I am. Ghost in the machine.

Just say judge judy. She's great, She knows whats really going on, even when it isnt.

Like when are digi-beta tapes going away like a bad dream? Is it real or is it Memorex?

cha said...

definitely a journey to find yourself whether you like it or not!......... but will you like what you see?

cha said...

funny zip !! judge judy..... will she like my painting?

no-where-man said...

reel? isnt that passee? you step up or u don't.

kalm james said...

Pdog, with all due respect, what I’m saying is that no matter how much you try to “embrace” Eastern aesthetics or “Kentucky” aesthetics you’re pretty much stuck with the tradition you were born into. Even if you try to erase them, you’ll still be seeing things through a particular lens. Actually, in regards to the recent influx of anime influence, among none Asians, most of it's just a brief infatuation with a trend, not some kind of serious embracing of another cultural tradition. Do they use maple syrup on the flap jacks in Japan?
Regarding victimization, I hosted a small discussion (God don’t let me say “consciousness raising” session) recently, a young artist/curator with somewhat of a following in Williamsburg brought up her disdain for what she called the “victim ghetto.” Her view was that it put artists into a box, and limited ones potential and the freedom needed to peruse an individual vision. Everyone's a victim of something, (cept me, I refuse). It's too late in the day to get into the political correctness issue.

mr.wakeup said...

Like I said previously:

'People do not know themselves...and if they do, they cannot express it... for many reasons...'

Some of these self-reflective ideas that are raised are so basic, that it bothers me...

no-where-man said...
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no-where-man said...

oops sorry about the above removed -

is this a purging place for angry painters - or could the posters view it up enthusiasm with there heros?

of course people reach out side of there circle of knowleadge for hero w0rship.

if the basic questions were answered no one would ask them.

mr.wakeup said...

For the past few months, I found it a 'duty' to post; it is getting quite difficult despite my appreciation of the fellow painters involved..

I really appreciate Painter's enthusiasm to post a new image, admirable in fact...

poppy said...

i don't know who is angry, hard to tell
strong opinions here since art started off as a trade and then became an opinion/elevated intellectual sport how many years ago? 500? more?.. so we all play along and it is fun for me...

mr.wakeup said...
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cha said...

it's fun for me too .. although that would quickly change if it was taken away from me!

Mr W Up.... huge pressure if you live off it? Do you make for the market consciously?

mr.wakeup said...
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wade said...

KJ,

Can't disagree more and that is the simple point I was making above... It is much easier (particularly for artists, I'd assume) to adopt an aesthetic than a culture, and the two are different.

I wasn't born into any aesthetic tradition, per se, but saw sesame street before titian and hokusai or rothko. Certainly doesn't mean I wanna make puppets.

And I was just watching a Japanese celebrity showing off his western style barbeque, with picnic table and accoutrements, on his deck, in the middle of Tokyo. Probably has maple syrup in the kitchen cabinet.

JpegCritic said...

Alright, after 2 days of ruminating on this jpeg, I
finally conclude that I think this picture is crap. But Z's video
did help shed some light upon it -- further illuminating
it's crappiness. At least darger knew how to make a
sensitive line. Who knows. Perhaps Line is enculturated.
Though I bet that such enculturation isnt based upon the
geographic nor ethnographic -- rather the slackergraphic.
And I'm not entirely against the 1-width ball point pen
type of aesthetic. It's just that the line here is crap.

Nice inventive cat crawling within the right-most head.
At first I hated the awkwardness of the cape-wing and
now it's my favorite part. Erase the rightmost figure,
yes the one with the cat, and it'll become a more mature,
less 'ham-fisted' composition. Like a meeting between
an urgent Darger and the strangely monastically reserved
Puvis de Chavannes.

Aww but see, all I think of now, when I see this jpeg,
is the video -- so my thoughts are suspect. Production
value versus artistic value. Fuck it. This one doesn't
have the weird nipple-sucking. I conclude this is crap.

painterdog said...

kalm james
that's true, I am viewing the Japan through my western lense. So your are right I was viewing my time there through my own cultural bagage.

I was just responding to you thinking my experience was just as a tourist. We all jump to conclusions to fast.

For what its worth the pancakes are nothing like we have here, the are savory,
with vegtables, meat, or shrimp in them and they are big.

There is Tokyo style, and Hiroshima style
for anyone intrested.

For me the best way into any culture is through food and drink. Sit down with someone for a good meal with some good wine, beer or sake and you can find a lot of comommon ground.

kalm james said...

P’dag, they sound more like crepes, don’t get me started on the French (joke).
Wade, your point about “adopting” an aesthetic is easier than a culture is true, but the crucial word here is “adopt”, rather than to “give birth to.” Sometimes the form is strong enough to provide a basis for traditions or aesthetics beyond it’s foundation, think of French rap (again with the French) when they tried to co-op the Gangsta sound it’s a farce, but when the introduced a kind of French poetic element they reinvented it with their own style, (which in my opinion sounded better). This kind of cross pollination is like a cultural mutant that sometimes leads to evolution, sometimes not. Whether you acknowledge it or not you were born into an aesthetic tradition, beyond TV there was your house, how things were arranged the colors etc. This is very sublet stuff creeps in with out notice, maybe even hardwired to a point.

Martin said...

(they are called okonomiyaki. they are about as much like a pancake as they are a pizza. they are neither.)

Hokusai studied European engravings that were used as wrapping paper for goods smuggled into Japan by the Dutch. He learned about and adopted ideas of shading, coloring, realism, and landscape perspective - and lots of other stuff like depictions of people in nature, the commoner, etc. Later of course all of that re-invigorated Japanese art was used to wrap Japanese goods for the Europeans and studied by artists like Van Gogh.

Sesshu, an earlier *awesome* Japanese artist, studied intensively in China.

painterdog said...

well all my Japaanese friends call them pancake(okonomiyaki)and they are kind of like that, or more like a crepes so I wont argue with you. I have been there(Japan) and that's what there like. Its a batter, water and eggs, with cabbage, chicken, shrimp or whatever you want cooked on a grill. With a brown sauce or mayo.

cha said...

KJ you're so right about how we view things through our background....

How much of the way we interpret a painting [like this one] is a reflection of us , rather than the artist....

kalm james said...

well said cha, sometimes wish we could switch into another head-set, but that's easier said than done. It is what the observer brings to the work that influences interpretation.

cha said...

Maybe you don't need to switch head-set.... just be aware of where you're coming from... and have the educated ability to separate the experience. [I suspect it's easier said than done]