8/24/2006

Thomas Trosch

25 comments:

Painter said...

(Califorina)

Martin said...

much like.

JD said...

I like his luscious paint handling. Some of the color and floaty imagery remind me a bit of Florine Stettheimer. This is head and shoulders above the atrocity of yesterday.

Cross said...

Dieben-korny.

zipthwung said...

Are we going to continue this low level formal discussion or is the formal not captivating enough for you to reach a more involved analysis?

I can understand a lack of entrainment - this image is crude, the florine stettheimer analysis is of course as easy as a four armed martian picking cherries from a cherry picker. Might I say upper east side school of diletantism? Sunday painting at its most refined. Burlesques the boring shit made by academic teachers at, oh, say, columbia and the collectors who CONSUME them (cherrys, consume, see I got the analogical thing going on my first cup of coffee).

To what end? Justin Craun's attenuated palette is of course designed to be ugly, florid yet jaundiced - and Thomas Trosch - angry cake welts. Reminds me of some dude on some this cable access show. S and M on TV. No shit. I was stunned.

John Currin is a more refined version of this. I dont kknow what to make of it really. You have an ANdy Warholic fascination with wealth, a horror combined with lust (for old ladies no less!) resulting in ersatz homages - nostalgia for the past and ever-present.

But why? What gives? In the end it seems dandified - you are what you eat, and they are.

Fuck your pommegranite paint daubs, your languid peril, your victorian retreat. Avalon is sinking like a termite mound in a sea of fire.

no-where-man said...

paper doll puke

zipthwung said...

Where do bad folks go when they die?
They dont go to heaven where the angels fly
They go down to the lake of fire and fry
Wont see them again till the fourth of july
I knew a lady who came from duluth
She got bit by a dog with a rabid tooth
She went to her grave just a little too soon
And she flew away howling on the yellow moon
Now the people cry and the people moan
And they look for a dry place to call their home
And try to find some place to rest their bones
While the angels and the devils
Fight to claim them for their own

closeuup said...

Not fire. We're all gonna drown darlin. Havent you been reading your Alexis Rothman? Flip past the S&M and watch the Spike Lee.

I saw Salman Rushdie on TV. He is brilliant and knows everything about history and current events. He has synthesized it all and writes beautiful books. But when the interviewer asks him what we should do, his eyes start spinning around in his head, and words come out but the gist of it is--he doesnt know what we should do.

Someone said this once: "To us [is committed] the important task of proving by example that a government, if organized in all its parts on the representative principle, unadulterated by the infusion of spurious elements, if founded not in the fears and follies of man but on his reason, on his sense of right, on the predominance of the social over his dissocial passions, may be so free as to restrain him in no moral right and so firm as to protect him from every moral wrong."

I'm not sure if this has anything to do with this painting.

zipthwung said...

Malcolm Moreley

The surface of American society is covered with a layer of democratic paint, but from time to time one can see the old aristocratic colours breaking through.
Alexis de Tocqueville

zipthwung said...

That government is best which governs least

-John Belushi

kelli said...

Artistic evidence against what Jeannette Winterson calls " the fad science of essentialism". Going to go inject myself with T now.

bruce said...

Better or worse then yesterday? I'm nott sure but I don't think either one is bad. They both share a philosophy: The less you concentrate (while you make a painting) the more you will achieve. That has reached a high saturation in painting. Now let me get down from this ficus tree to get a better look, step, step, climb, ok.
hmm. I'll put this one in the category of "Great Thrift Store Purchase"

kalm james said...

Painter, thanks for this posting. I think this cat is one of the rare unique voices out there right now. This isn’t one of his better examples but between his “weird chick” subject matter, his cynical gouges at the shallow art world crowd and his sickeningly goopy paint handling he hits a cord that dozens of hot young New York artists are striving for. In the early to mid nineties he was doing large scaled pieces with big-eyed art-social-sycophants spouting meaningless blather in overhead bubbles. This might be “bad painting” but as apposed to Craum, this is “bad” with some kind of fetishistic personal urgency, rather than a contrived strategy, the best of “Bad”.

Cross said...

I'm ready for 'good'.

lion king said...

Maybe some of you haven't seen irl.
He is one of my favs.

wade said...

Nice piece at the top zip. I missed the connection between avalon sinking and painting though.

zipthwung said...

TENNYSON

oranges

I guess I dunno, whatever, where have all the flowers gone, far far away. J Alfred Prufrock, guilded cages, made beds, reaping, sewing...

Gentlemen, he said,
I don't need your organization, I can shine my own shoes, I can move my own mountains and I can mark my own cards.

wade said...

I'd like to hear something beyond the formal on the Craun painting.

kelli said...

Wade that's kind of difficult because of the tight obedience to the photo source and in a way that lacks the political content of someone like Richter.

no-where-man said...

tranny art informel collector

kalm james said...

As a painter I love the contrasts. 10th Street touch and New York School in Barbie doll colors. Some parts are thick and knifed on like cake icing, or squeezed right from the tube, others are bare canvas with nothing but pencil line ala Twombly. There’s a sense of the incongruent, like putting eyeliner and blush on a drooling chancre. A patheticness of keeping up appearances, the “decorative” gone sleezie.

wade said...
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wade said...

Painter has a sense of humor, with these posts.

wade said...

Well, I thought people liked the craun because its play on pop imagery...(assuming he painted like he did on purpose)...instead of an icon of commerce or of graphic arts its some retro detritus. Twisted, big and patterened it has a sense of emptiness and horror.

To me its still ugly, and implies a bit of self-loathing. Like, O, our horriblie empty beast of a culture, this is all we have and this is what it looks like.

May be totally off base, but seems as sentimental and morbidly romantic as anything posted. Peyton is hard in comparison.

As for this, I like the scummy painting part, and that it doesn't take itself too seriously.

kalm james said...

Wade, you’d asked if someone had an analysis of the Craum piece that wasn’t “Formal.” What kind of story would you like? What kind of “narrative” or background would make the painting better? Is it possible to have a crappy painting, not saying the Craum is, ( trying to be gentle) that a back-story would somehow make better? If this is true, perhaps we should be cultivating back-stories instead of paintings?