8/16/2006

Larry Poons

58 comments:

Mark said...

There is life after illusion.

Cooky Blaha said...

I hope this one is old school

kelli said...

I have no real idea why but always liked him. Ratty and hairy.

Mothra said...

Kind of amazing how current these look. He's like an old rocker who kept plugging away, meanwhile Giles Lyon and Steve DiBenedetto came along, singing the same tune.

Martin said...

this is five years old.

Mothra said...

Yah, I got that. Not easy to keep it up when you're 70, but whoops, there it is. Compatriot from Tokyo. He survived a near-death brush with Kandinsky and came out smelling like daisies.

bluebalz said...

hes always been great, he has had a lot of incarnations in terms of styles, which he didnt stick with his early signature Poons, but moved on, they really do look current, actually more interesting that dibenedetto or lyons that someone mentioned. there was one stage where he made these huge crusty poured paintings, very unelegant and rough, someone maybe overooked because he is old and had made his mark earlier, people tend not to look further when someone falls off the radar.

closeuup said...

Love Larry. I've wanted to put his work up on my blog for ages, but I couldn't choose just one. Where Martin B. & Frankenthaler give the formal a bad name, these give you a reason for living.

And I need one today.

Cross said...

Awright! Go Larry!

exu said...

bring on the rat take away the sugar

zipthwung said...

I like anchovies

no-where-man said...

my cones are going crazy!

painterdog said...

Poons came to our grad program to do crits.

He critisized peoples work without any pretense, and was very funny and over the top.

He called an ass an ass so to speak.

If your work was lacking he called you on it. He used a lot of humor to get his point across. He was hard as tack and took no prisioners.

Unlike some other artist who would leave people in tears for no reason other than using their power and ego to insult.

Cooky Blaha said...

How is this current? I guess I can see a Benidetto connection but all this has me thinking of (besides Dominoe's) is those boring french painters from the 50s that were second generation abexers. can't think of any of their names, this Poussette Dart is kind of what I'm thinking of

I dont really like either but why would you rag on Frankenthaler but like this?

closeuup said...

If you can't see the difference, I can't make you see it.

I'll just say this. Larrys work seem searching and inventive. I liked HF when I first encountered it, but over time it became repetitive.

zipthwung said...

Because frankenthaler went to Bennington and shamelessly shilled for Rolex when her whole dealio is religious abstraction. Shes a girly girl too. Duh.

zipthwung said...

whirly art

is what Hofstadter call his doodles. And he's smart, too.

kelli said...

Cooky I guess these appeal to me more than Frankenthaler because where she was corporate and mannered these are frantic and I can't totally get a grip on them. Even his early stuff with the dots was stranger than it should have been. I kind of feel the same way about Polke and Klee. I was thinking before about the limitations of strategy. He seems to be operating on a level beyond his obvious strategy. I can't totally articulate it which might be part of the appeal.

Mothra said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Mothra said...

Pousette-Dart was from Minnesota & was solidly first-generation American ab-ex, btw.

David Coffin said...

“He seems to be operating on a level beyond his obvious strategy. I can't totally articulate it which might be part of the appeal.”

Wow.

Can I borrow this, kelli? I’m working on this Statement of Purpose right now, for, like, my whole life, and this pretty much nails it... thanx.

seriously. (...And the Klee thing, too)

zipthwung said...

The Reality of Karel Appel, a film by Dutch director Jan Vrijman and music by Dizzy Gillespie and Karel Appel was released in 1961


This is a great movie and epitomizes good marketing to people in search of meaning but who dont have time. I laughed every time they showed it in painting class.

If you can't explain yourself dont expect other people to get you. Do you get me? Me neither. Say what you mean and mean what you say. Humpty Dumpty.

kelli said...

David you want to borrow my doofy admission that some things leave me clueless and I kind of like it? I'm drooling and trying to regain motor control. I hope the people who read your artist's statement are baked.
Cooky you kind of mean people like Antoni Tapies right? I could see that.

Cooky Blaha said...

i really cant remember their names. There are a whole bunch of artists who are like 2nd rate de staels, status wise, but much more known in Europe. I dont have the book with all of them with me now so I'm just babblin sorry

zipthwung said...

take the quizz!

David Coffin said...

OK, I’ll just hold it to my chest, but really, not everybody I meet would rather talk about art, no matter how obscurely, than breathe it. And I thought it was considerably more... “comprehensive“? “open-ended”? than, say, Kandinsky's guidelines: "Lend your ears to music, open your eyes to painting, and… stop thinking! Just ask yourself whether the work has enabled you to 'walk about' into a hitherto unknown world. If the answer is yes, what more do you want?"

vita sackville-west said...

I rather enjoy Roger Fry's work.

Mothra said...

Interesting. I don't see Tapies in relation to Poons, really. He came to abstraction through surrealism & dada. I see Poons more as a descendent of Kandinsky, painting music & synaesthesia, that kind of thing.

Mothra said...

Okay, thanks David Coffin, you said it better than me.

kelli said...

Mothra doesn't he come out of Op Art? Which is really strange right and even his early Op Art paintings were a lot better than his contemporaries, trippier and with more depth.
I'm seeing Tapies with this image because of the ugly clunkiness and semirepresentational marks.

Mothra said...

Hmm, Vita, that name does ring a bell. His work sits well with me, too.

zipthwung said...

Synesthesia is interesting because people come up with it on their own - in the same way that you can figure out that a volmetric material like water can appear to be less or more depending on the shape it's poured into.

Hoffstadter I think came up with synesthesia on his own - i think its innate - part of the language ability that extends to other animals, apparently. Caw caw caw...

Organizing your thoughts is what people like - ordered and coherent. Corporations like easy categories and efficient systems. I do to.

dirty girl chick said...

Yes! Larry Poons! Mr. Poons visited my program as well and he was indeed great. His comments regarding my work were critcal but very constructive and absolutlely correct. He he a great artist and a wonderful human being. Everyone in my program loved his visit.

Mothra said...

Poons' earlier work was definitely minimal/op, and yes he seems to be really good at whatever style he puts his hand to. Kandinsky had his hard-edge period, too, now that you mention it.

Mothra said...

But I was referring more to the recent work, e.g., the painting posted here.

vita sackville-west said...

Rings a Vanessa Bell, perhaps, Mothra?
I don't see Tapies either, Mothra. Not even on a superficial level.
Sorry Kelli, I usually agree with everything you say.

Mothra said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Mothra said...

Veni, Veni, Vita. Even a wunderkind has an off-day once in awhile, leibling.

vita sackville-west said...

Tell that to Lytton Strachey, Mothra. I appreciate your support, darling.

zipthwung said...

pollock

pollock

This is nice But I dont like the frame.

How about gene davis?

zipthwung said...

ring a ding dong it.

Mothra said...

How about that Geena Davis? Loved her in Commander-in-Chief.

Nice Pollocks, zip. Another surrealist who went the ab-ex route. I smell School of Paris.

zipthwung said...

I liked her in the long kiss goodnight. Deer in the headlights.

Check out this dude

Mothra said...

zip, is that you?!?!!?

zipthwung said...

I think Michel Legoff is my new favorite painter before Christian Riese Lassen and way ahead of Kinkade. Fuck that dude.

zipthwung said...

this is me

just kidding

Im the one on the right

hrere I am younger on the left

heres my album

heres a friend of mine

Mark said...

zip, your very funny, where did you find those pictures. Heraldo went for the broken plates...
Painter, thanks for this one, age/wisdom has beauty and relevence.

no-where-man said...

Did he really have a house where poets would read with toilet seats around there necks, and they would "try to drive away there audeince"? what colour is your nihilism.


"Nothing's gonna rehabilitate me!
"I'll be the same tomorrow and the same next week!"
Then he actually swept my feet with his broom.

zipthwung said...

pablum puking maggots!

kostabi was on that show.

kelli said...

Vita if we have a new Bloomsbury can anyone convince Alan Cumming to visit. He won't even need to wear a toilet seat.
I'm still trying to figure out why Poons was better than other Op Art and I don't know if synasthesia is the reason.. Bridget Riley was good because her work was so perfect.

kalm james said...

Technically Poons wasn’t really an Op artist. Irving Sandler places him in with the “Color Field Painters.” Op Art was thrust on New York by William Seitz who spent two years curating “The Responsive Eye” which appeared at the MoMA in 1965, and included Poons. New York critics took a dismal view of the whole affair calling it (Op Art) “out of towner art” obviously threatened by its instant popularity with the fashion and trendy conscious collectors and institutions (not to mention the English and Europeans) of the time. Poons was one of the youngest of the Greenberg coterie (even got involved in the psychoanalytical “cult” the all the Greengergianians were into) and was differentiated from the Op artists as being an “optical,” abstractionist, an apparent distinction without difference. But the American critics like Rose, Krauss and Lippard were shilling for Greenberg and wanted to maintain America’s recent ascendance as “Capitol of the Art World.” For my money Poons, for all his flaws, is interesting for the many detours he’s taken along the way from the dot paintings, to the bucket of paint paintings, to the throwing paint over all kinds of shit paintings, to finally returning to the waco quasi nineteen fifties bad Polish abstraction that this painting kind of represents.

Met him at his opening at Side-Show last fall, and he’s a very hospitable guy. He even drives a Vincent Black Shadow scooter, pretty cool for an old dude.

wade said...

KJ, you ageist...but since everyone is sorta liking this, I would take the yellow ferris wheel at the top, but get rid of half the toppings, light on the mozarella.

I was thinking of Poons poured paintings when the previous picture was posted. Maybe martin should put his meatballs on some different noodles, like these

brent hallard said...

Poons, in these full on paintings, had this thing about forcing issues, most of them structural, of many which we would consider incongruent--employing different talk to activate and give depth to a stretched canvas--very different from say a cooled down Lasker approach.
You can pick parts to pieces in Poons. I have done so in the past. But what good does that do?

Couple of little balls up there in the right:)

Altogether not talking the same ball game as the previous post.

BR's late work is about slowing things down. Her earlier words didn't have much to do with the structure of the painting premise and its limits, though were beautifully crafted. I still like all--each artist, time, location, and period. Altogether Just about focusing / and a refocusing on different things.

vita sackville-west said...

Oh, Alan will be Cumming. He will not resist our Bloomsbury, Kelli.

zipthwung said...

fuck bloomsbury

kelli said...

Zip you are invited but don't bring Kinkade. Nobody wants him pissing on the animatronic creatures.

zipthwung said...

Thanks, can I bring Wan Ko Yee ?

kelli said...

Yes if he is willing to wear the toilet seat. Nobody else is up for it.