2/20/2007

Christian Sampson

36 comments:

Painter said...

Christian Sampson @
Mehr Gallery
436 West 18th Street
New York, NY 10011

Ursula's Dad said...

Dang, I missed this street. Can anyone describe this picture for us?

PrettyPablum said...

Is that string?
its like James Siena went back to kindergarden.

ol' blue nose said...

Reminds me more of Eva Hesse or Picabia's string pieces.

zipthwung said...

i like the design. i wish it wasn't art. SO it references art history? That sucks. Why does everything have to be a part of a genre? Is it all postmodern all the time now? Or is that a non-issue like do I use toilet paper or not?

SPeaking of hygiene, you know how they use like an inch more than you could possibly use of toothpaste in ads? Thats some sort of sugestibility thing, like when they put the bananas next to the cereal in the grocery store.

Im hip to it, and Im sure you are too.

Speaking of feminist festivalist fiber arts and stuff - If the MOMA gets a stealth bomber I'll tag it, no sweat.

zipthwung said...

this is a nice eva hesse

I think it references Rirkrit Tirivanija by way of the Diggers, who started the whole free food thing by way of Jesus or Gordon Matta Clark, depending on what year it is right now.

artgirl said...

i love string art. reminds me of 2nd grade.

zipthwung said...

this
is all I can remember about fourth grade.

zipthwung said...

i guess someone went to a magnet school or something.

me im thinkin clown said...

meticulously controlled silly string??
so earnest, yet so third grade.
im definitely a fan...

so clever and beautiful said...

I think this piece raises some interesting questions about The Linear, Form, Color, and the Decorative. The use of the colored strings unites line, form and color into one uniform whole. The blotchy painting in the background calls this prominent (and protuberant) use of linearity into question through its more conventional linkage of form with color. I often wonder what people mean when they criticize a painting for being too "linear"; one problem may be the decorative associations that line tends to bring. This painting, since it refers to both traditional abstract painting and 1970s crafts, reminds me of the Arts and Crafts Movement of the late 19th-early 20th centuries, when line became a powerful formal device for artsits who wanted to force nature into the realm of decoration and craft. This artist seems to want to force painting in that direction, albeit through very different means. However, this piece remains rooted in a fine-arts context, unless it is presented in some unorthodox way (the jpg does not seem to indicate that it does). The artist, a recent graduate of Hunter's MFA program (is HYC the new HYP?), is probably very aware of the prevalence of both awkward abstraction and a decorative impulse in art right now. So: is there anybody who can provide me with some examples of other yarn-using artists working right now?

Concrete Phone said...

I have the idea that this is just an idea of doing something by hand and getting involved with it. This artist needs a bit more time to see where all this can go. The above image is stacked on the rigid, and is slightly off to the Froebel. Is there more? I'll look!
WONKY ABSTRACTION

zipthwung said...

RIIIIGHT NOW?~!!!!
Now for me is a decade or so, so ill go with the shows Ive seen that incorporated yar - i dont htink theres a wall hanger yard person in NY? Xenobia Bailey makes stuff. There are tons of knitters as well..

matthew Jackson was in the whitney biennial you can group him somehow with Andrew Guenther who did some yarn.

I dont think anyone makes a career out of it unless its some kind of feminist-marxist deal though right?

We can go with artists who use braided rug...seems kind of a dead end to me though. How about stuff that is tied up - the genre of bundle artists? The bead people? Beads are a good one. There was a dude who patented reflectors for his sole use in ARRRRT.

zipthwung said...

fred sandback is the last real yaaaarn dude right? I mean real died in the wool minimalist abstraction.

Cabinet magazine had some articles on knot theory and paper folding algorythms - neat stuff. you can read Hoefstadter's two tomes and tell me about patterns.

Then there are the tape artists.

If you want to promote anton Kerns stable you got Laura Scnitger who does some yarn, and Grhotjan who might as well use yarn, why not.
Jim lambie' middle name is stripe. Or it was, maybe hes changed it all McGuffin style.

Oh and Rosmarie Trockel had a yarn Rothko up - real swell mustve taken her machine ages to knit.

zipthwung said...

i noticed some doilys too - anyone got that one? I take credit for that via the snowflake fractal meme. ESP, mind controll lasers - you know the whole deal. Operation Doily. Now you know.

zipthwung said...

dool makers. You got tons of dolls out there. Everything form yayoi kusama obsessive to didactic loise bourgeois - penises. You got sock monkeys as art even. Where does it end? Its like an Ariadne's web knit of passion for well, craft.

zipthwung said...

cut paper - dias de las muertes - tissue thin doilys of doom. Ok. Sorry.

closeuup said...

forcing nature or force of nature?

i like Judith Scott. The lady that wraps things in yarn. Her stuff kills me.

zipthwung said...

are you looking at the shirt?

it has a really high thread count.

zipthwung said...

http://www.hamandenos.com/woolworld/woolworld.html
The reason I want to make a New York section is because its trendy here to knit, in fact, the first week I was here I found by accident this shop called “Get Knitting” one flight up on sixth Avenue in the west village… and when I went up this woman was right in my face going “ARE YOU HERE FOR THE CLASS???” and im like no but I looked past her and could see all these people sat round a table and all the peripheral woolly gear, and it was really odd.She wouldn’t let me in the store to browse because, I don’t know she had to start her class or something. I made a mental note to go back to the shop and see what they had but then I never needed to go back because similar little knit-boutiques started appearing in all sorts of locations, one in my street even, called “purl” , one I saw after some Japanese sushi walking down avenue A called “knitting new york” and so on and so on.the reason these boutiques are so enticing to me is because in Glasgow it's very difficult to find any kind of place that sells wool, the craft has completely declined there. There it was pragmatic and cost effective to knit. Here it's aspirational.

Concrete Phone said...

I think yarn is all round the world. I'm told that if you hold one end of it, and someone holds the other end, it gets told.

Yeah, some people whittle: Start off with something and whittle it down. OTHERS JUST FOLD, when I tell that story.

Boom boom

zipthwung said...

we are all in this together
baby.

closeuup said...

”It might sound cocky/but is it really cocky if you know that it’s true?”

so clever and beautiful said...

oh, dear...I don't know how I forgot that it is TOTALLY POINTLESS to write in to this blog because the only person who ever comments is Zipth. With the occasional intervention of the very similar Close Up. I guess everybody else got scared away. Even so: thanks to them for some string refs.

zipthwung said...

xanadu

poppy said...

hi scab,
I don't mind engaging..
I'm curious why you feel this painting remains rooted in the fine art context? Is it the abstract background that functions as a salutations, and if so, do you feel it is too polite to be taken seriously?

zipthwung said...

i think this work is architectural in an amityville gambrel roof kind of way. Does anyone else get this sense of dark horror or am I alone in the dark on that?

Another association is with macrame or wire sculpture and geometric images like op art and wire and nail drawings of boats or mandallas.

I could go on but I hope someone would like to comment on the aspirational aspect of using yarn in context of the art market, because as you know, I am primarily interested in the sociological and cultural/anthropological angles in the circuitry.

closeuup said...

the arts and crafts movement was anti-industrial. Pre industrial artists "forced nature" into decoration since the beginning of time.

do you think this artist relates to that reactionary impulse? is this anti-market?

zzzzz

artgirl said...

I have to say that I came back to this day and thought maybe there is more there than simple string art. The artist is using line in a different sort of way but I think the only reason it is different is because it is yarn and we can see it.
poppy - if I could respond to your comment. I don't think it is that it is too polite to be taken seriously. I think it is just too different to be taken seriously.
I think once things go a bit astray the viewer tends to not know what to do with it. Myself included.

zipthwung said...

good points. Closeup im fascinated by the anti-market angle. Could you elaborate? I dont think this work is a pinting, and not anti market. In fact Id say its anti painting as painting but pro market.

artgirl im glad you reconsidered

heres something someone did with craft

I think martha thinks the show is frumpy, not sure. Radical lace? I mean that could be pretty funny. But it isnt, right?

Then theres the cut thread of community, tthe whole cloth of embroidered fabrication, the warp and woof of the establishment rubric...

"Anonymous was a woman"

Bears repeating:

Some young'un asked if during the Cold War she was pressured by her employers at the newspaper to write certain things, or about certain artists. Roberta was silent for a moment, then said, very deadpan, "how OLD do you think I am?"

poppy said...

Is this artist approaching art as a crafts person, painter, both, and does it matter?..
I think it help in understanding the mindset behind this painting which I don't feel is beyond classification.
The fact that it is almost a welcome mat may be the anti art market strategy.
I have a story about a craft person that wanted to be considered fine art - like painting - making jewellery..so they hung them on black and white abstract paintings..Bad and sad move,...It cancelled each other out and became nothing.

closeuup said...

Any art can be "market". That depends on the salesperson. Most people buy the new and the cool, not the quality (or the qualities).

My granny (the eastern european one) was a great 'tatter" which is a lacemaker. I used to love watching her sticks go. The lace poured out like water. She was also brutal and she wouldnt let my mom go to college. My mom wanted to be a lawyer. (note to SCAB--that's what I do. I relate the personal to the political. I try to connect art to real life. Sorry you dont appreciate it)

artgirl said...

does it really matter if they are approaching it as an arts and crafts project or a painting? isn't it what the piece says to you that matters? I think it is easier to look at things when we don't classify but I think it is something that many of us are used to doing. It is easy to categorize but I think what is more difficult is to not and just look at the piece for what it is. No strings attached.

zipthwung said...

maybe its a P1

poppy said...

artgirl, dont get me wrong.. I understand this point of view and agree with some of it, but, given our collective background knowledge etc.. some artists take it upon themselves to classify their own work regardless of how it might be interpreted. This doesn't read as an 'it is what it is piece' Feels intentionally made for our collective understanding, It is made to be interpreted as art within a particular context.

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