9/12/2006

Chie Fueki

42 comments:

Painter said...

Chie Fueki @
Mary Boone
541 W 24
New York, NY 10011

exu said...

nice quilt designs

kalm james said...

Pattern and Decorative, yeah, I thought it was time for a reevaluation. Any glitter, crushed pearl or gold leaf?

closeuup said...

One of the great reasons to get into the arts in the first place is so you can ignore football and all that stupidity. Not for me...

zipthwung said...

I dont know what the football player represents but the last show I saw had birds and stuff. THey were smaller, and it was in a smaller gallery, so I guess they weren't worth as much, but I think they were better.

welcome to the floating world

Is Chie Fueki a football fan? My guess is that its more a bridging of the cultures sort of thing. Multicultural stuff.

One last thing - Im not a fan of pattern and decoration even though I like patterns. Its a trap I dont want to get into. What if all you really do is design paisley patterns?

zipthwung said...

cardboard guitar anyone?

Spectacle.

zipthwung said...

cardboard guitar anyone?

Spectacle.

kalm james said...

This figure is actually a body-builder and the pose is known as a full frontal lat spread, one of the four or five mandatory poses for IFBB (International Federation of Body Builders) competition.

closeuup said...

same thing

zipthwung said...

Tan.Hibiscus. Cannabus.
Hawaii? Haowlie. Sun Tan.
Ganguro.

SisterRye said...

This looks like something that would hang in a pipe shop in the Haight-Ashbury.

devinlevin said...

someone's gotta kick 'sisterrye' out of here.
she has no idea what she's talking about.

Cooky Blaha said...

thats not nice.....

Would these same criticisms go for Tomaselli as well?

closeuup said...

devinlevin said...
This post has been removed by the author.

zipthwung said...

Yes, Tomaselli is not immune. He has assistants so no "obsessive" credit like Yayoi kusama or a tibetan/hopi mandala painter. I mena obsessive just doesnt cut it - otherwise every stoner with a trip book would be on the market right?
Thou shall shit it out.

Calvinism.
Hedonism.

I said it once, Ill say it again
I like the quilts
of gees bend.

here is a cool quilt.

In some countries of Europe and in Japan, chrysanthemums are symbolic of death and are only used for funerals or on graves. In the United States, the flower is usually seen as more positive and cheerful.

subversive

zipthwung said...

Arts and Crafts movement was in large part a reaction to industrialization, if looked at on the whole, it was neither anti-industrial nor anti-modern. Some of the European factions believed that machines were in fact necessary, but they should only be used to relieve the tedium of mundane, repetitive tasks.

arts and crafts

is it time?

no-where-man said...

worth seeing in person, there beady ground is highly labor intensive. nice david salle in the back room.

cha said...

She celebrates muscled man... and girlifies [sp?] him......

no-where-man said...

More from the 'teachings of matthew barney' not all muscle men but sports if i recall correctly.

heh thx painter considering my approch to the Artworld the "sneaky" shot is spot on. - flattered ;)

kalm james said...

It would be an over simplification to think that there’s something unmasculine about the decorative. In Asian culture the male is often the “Peacock” spending much time, effort and money to create elaborate costumes. I believe it was the Dorian Greeks who first introduced the idea of the austere as being “masculine” about 1500 B.C. The feminization of the decorative might have been their way of denigrating the Persians who were known for their extravagant dress and ornamentation. The first “girlyman.”

There were wonderful male artists like Robert Zakanich, Robert Kushner, Kim MacConnel and Ned Smyth that were in on the first wave of the P&D movement. The great women of the movement like Miriam Schapiro and Joyce Kozloff would probably not have gotten the same amount of attention if it, P&D, had been seen as a strictly feminist tendency. Surprisingly most of these folks are still grinding away at the same thing but these days in obscurity.

Time for a survey and review of the influence they’ve had on current practitioners. This artist Chie Fueki in the “Boone-docks” makes me think other people might be thinking likewise.

no-where-man said...

Is Chinese art a hot growth a

no-where-man said...

ooops my bad, should read

" Is Chinese art a hot growth area in a superheated art market?"

devinlevin said...

what does chinese art have to do with a japanese artist?

camron said...

I like pregnant women.

bruce said...

A body builder looks up into the sky out of his existance cube. What are these strange dots of light? Why is my roof missing, and wait, am I made of flowers. I thought it was water.

Curiouser and Curiouser.

bruce said...

existence

cha said...

KJ good point about the cultural/ history aspect.
As he's outside the box... maybe he's a gift [wrapping paper patterns et al].
Bodybuilding's not my thing , so I go with "denigration".

closeuup said...

I always felt like P&D was some marketing strategy by Holly Solomon. An excuse for some loud paintings? Didnt seem significant at all.

Miriam SHapiro to James Gobel...that's important work.

kalm james said...

closeup, no doubt there were market forces at work, as well as a change in the attitudes towards the dominant movements of the 60s which were Pop and Minimalism. P&D was a way to use the grid of the Minimalists with a nod to the ‘Low arts” and crafts that women and designers had been producing for centuries. I think the level of “multi-cultural” influences and pluralism might have weakened its status as a formalistic classification. In New York it seems, people need one fearless leader, one doctrine, one goal and one party line. That’s why we have such huge crowds hanging out on the “cutting edge”.

zipthwung said...

»Just as water, gas, and electricity are brought into our houses from far off to satisfy our needs in response to a minimal effort, so we shall be supplied with cultural commodities, which will appear and disappear at a simple movement of the hand, hardly more than a sign.«

-Steve Jobs

zipthwung said...

"I felt that by making a large canvas magnificent in color, design, and proportion, filling it with fabrics and quilt blocks, I could raise a housewife's lowered consciousness."

-Martha Stewart

devinlevin said...

can we stop with the stupid quotes?
this is a forum to talk about art.
leave your quotes on your own blog.

zipthwung said...

Decinlevin. THanks for your interest. Please say something interesting. Otherwise here are a few suggested topics:



1) Is pattern and decoration rigourous?

2) Chevrons- like or dislike?

4) What do the Opium Wars have to do with anything?

5) Does Japan have influences or is she visionary?

JpegCritic said...

forget topics. I'm tellin yall now.
INVEST in China if you have the money.
Japanese art or no japanese art.
Your children will thank you for it.

closeuup said...

peggie--we are all investing in china, whether we want to or not

JpegCritic said...

Closeuup, don't know how to take that,
but for those of you who want not...

You can blame our american finacial complex
for that -- a debt-centric institution that values
speculative investment more than it values
the production and circulation of real goods.

Funny how art mirrors real life.

We are beyond the point, closeuup, of
returning to the time when our production
was greater-to-or-equal-to our debt-spending.
I'm cynical in this view, yes.

In order to get out:
1) Less speculation
2) More institutional value on sweat-equity.

I think this should (or will)
be reflected in our art market
once we realize that our production capacity
(thought as well as material) has been diminished
by the shadow of speculation and it's methodologies.
In essence, we tend to invest on things that
have not been produced yet. We build confidence
in innovation, yet we relegate the physical infrastructures
that can test and build upon ideas to the 3rd world.
Those infrastructures are the key to innovation.
American industry has, in effect, 'forgotton' how
to build and test things cuz the builders and testers
have long been farmed out oversesas.

The masters money may be here (um...really?)
but the masters tools are elsewhere.

Finance -- the financial institution -- with its
speculative values -- is the American Emporer
who will one day have no clothes.

JpegCritic said...

Postscript:
Investing is fine -- I can do that.
But investing in Investing is a recipe for a logical crash.

But please, beefore investing overseas, pay back all your
credit card debt, pllleze, as a gesture of
defiance toward your emporer.

vitelloni said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Cooky Blaha said...

saw this in person, was really astounding up close....
Im still not 100% with the subjects and from far away something becomes too static, perhaps in the composition but all in all nice show

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