5/31/2006

Keith Mayerson















27 comments:

triple diesel said...

(left) Tin Tin and Snowy, 2005
oil on linen
107 x 86 cm

(middle) Fassbinder and Warhol on the set of Querelle, 2006
oil on linen
91 x 132 cm

(right) Good Rockin’ Tonight, 2005
oil on linen
163 x 117 cm

Cross said...

Welcome home, Toto.

zipthwung said...

wearable art

Uncle Jesse said...

is that Jimmy Page, doing "dazed and confused" with an acoustic guitar? i don't remember him doing that bow trick on "unplugged"...
nice texture on that fassbinder one!

exu said...

tastes like chicken

artgirl said...

yuck.

brian edmonds said...

What in the hell is this? Lol. I picked up a painting similiar to these at a thrift store. It was of a teen on a dirt bike slinging mud. It was great.

artgirl said...

brian - your thrift store painting sounds like an awesome find! We should post that on here.

cadmiumredlite said...

ditto yuck, bad painting masquerading as hip

devinlevin said...

really?
does everything have to be so crappy and half-assed?
it's so not cool to actually make a commitment to making something these days.
(sigh)

GrandmaNelly said...

Devinlevin. If you are referring to the comments being made I agree. They are half assed and show casing stupidity.
I like these paintings. They are genuine and sweet. I don't get the impression that this artist is after cool at all just showing his interest.

no-where-man said...

fun.
i approve.

flesheater99 said...

something is going on in the area of that guitar. It's kinda dizzying. there's a ton of info in the bottom half of that piece...it reverberates back and forth from the mic-stand to the guitar and back again to the shadow under the arm. There is a richness there that I don't really find in the other half of the painting.

closeuup said...

If "showing your interest" was all it took, Id be in bed with Clive Owen right now.

GrandmaNelly said...

Can you get Clive and then would all have to watch? I guess your interest are not as interesting.

tumbleweed said...

Ah, this is strange because I cannot be unbiased on these.
Keith Mayerson was my teacher for a while! He was this extremely kind, laid-back weirdo who dropped way too much acid in the seventies. Looked extremely shady, a little greasy, and had a wonky speech pattern. But he was a great teacher; for his enthusiasm and encouragement especially.
He was really really into comic books. Manga especially. And all the times we talked about Tin-tin in class makes that one piece extra weird to me.
Of all my teachers, he was the most reluctant to show or talk about his work with his students. Flat out refused and it made him uncomfortable to talk about it with us.

So seeing his work pop up from time to time on the internet is always a bit of a jolt! I wonder: how can you appreciate/critique the art of someone whom you already really really like as a person, or on the opposite dislike? I can't remove my affection for this weirdo Keith Mayerson when I look at these.

no-where-man said...

There's a loving in there eyes, which is similar to that of most thrift store paintings, the techinque may be low but the subject is high. thats interesting.

i have not been to this show but the one jpeg grabs me
" But then, Warhol was always drawn to knowing (and portraying in his art) people who reveled in pushing their talents and hopes to limits unimaginable just a few years before. Above, we see Warhol on the set of Rainer Werner Fassbinder's film Querelle (1982), which starred Brad Davis, an actor at least as beautiful and talented as (but also bolder than) many others in Hollywood. Fassbinder's film of Jean Genet's underground novel was a risky venture in 1982 (it still would be today), and Warhol was siding with that risk by posing with its creators (later designing a poster for the film).

awe.

chris moss said...

I love these things. Lovely, courageous, and a little bit stupid.

EZ PEE said...

billions of blue blistering barnacles! This be Red Rackam's treasure for sure!
Too much white, rough brushwork and full frontal compositions are what they are.

Folk art for Folks. WHo are your people, people?

I was reading Elizabeth Sussman's self congratulatory article on the 1993 Whitney Biennial, which I believe she curated, entitled "the way we were" - CAA Art Journal, Spring. No, I'm not a member. That magazine has some godawfull writing in it. And it's not ironicly naive, nor even deliberately and heartwarmingly so.

In conclusion: Postmodern identity politics and stuff.
frame by frame.

closeuup said...

The Querelle painting reminds me of the 70s book Rock Dreams and the paintings by Guy Pellaert. I loved that book and I think it was very influential, being one of the first series of celebrity worship fantasy series. Like this painting, it was a bunch of tableaus. I think Taschen has re-released it.

Pellaert's airbrush style seems much more interesting to me than this Mayerson, though. I bet Pierre & Gilles were influenced by it.

Anyway, if you are making icons, then this Mayerson is more like a Giotto.

mr.wakeup said...

velasquez

mr.wakeup said...

... this is presently quite boring; leaves me nowhere as far as what the aim of the artist is- I get a small sense of where this artist is at...???; yet I am intriqued enough to want to see them in the flesh. Where can I?

sucka4surface said...

If the subject matter were not so identifiable, would the paint quality be interesting at all? I mean, you could see things just as good at the Washington Square Arts Festival but with more mundane images.

ad3pt said...

reminds me of something that javier peres would sell

triple diesel said...

mr.wakeup: You might like to see the texture. Derek Eller represents Keith Mayerson, although the current images are from his show at Alain Noirhomme in Belgium.

jean said...

he was the best the best painter in los angeles if you ask me. i've seen a few of his shows and he is very talented- always changing and very prolific.

froggyorg said...

Tumbleweed said mayerson did too much acid in the 70's... I grew up with him. we were all of 13 years old by 1979 and living in a rather non-acidic boring suburb in colorado. Trust me - he's had the personality since grade school. It's not acid. He's always been amazingly creative and had a spacey demeanor. He had a houseplant and family photo on his desk when he was in fifth grade. I have pen and ink drawings from him from high school and college - amazing. I can't wait to see where his work goes during the next ten years! And for those of you who've already said it, he is a genuinely nice guy.