5/05/2006

Helen Verhoeven

33 comments:

Painter said...

Helen Verhoeven @
Wallspace
619 W. 27th Street
New York, NY 10001

no-where-man said...

YAWN

oilybrushes said...

i have a feeling that this work references a book i read recently, Lambs of God by Marele Day. Have yet to look into that...

oilybrushes said...

Hmm not so sure after looking at the rest of the work online.

oilybrushes said...

Why is this work YAWN?

no-where-man said...

just a gut reaction - so surreally wierdy

exu said...

we're in a drought with only liquid thorazine to drink

oilybrushes said...

well, yes my gut reaction was that this must be an illustration related to the book about a remote sect of nuns with a sheep named Agnes. I suppose that is a bit yawnish. But I don't really see sureally-weirdy, saved only by the fact that figures fit with the prespectival drift and sway of shadows. This images seems cinematic.

oilybrushes said...

"Despite nods to outsider art, bible school illustrations and medieval symbology, Verhoeven’s paintings are neither narrative nor realist — precise markings are spliced with spontaneous gesture and naive stylization, foregrounding the structure of the painting as a space of possibility, with narrative cues as free floating and suggestive as the spaces themselves." -from her press release for this show.
What is with all the nodding to outsiderness that goes on these days?

Cross said...

Al Held meets Lego-sheep.

oilybrushes said...

lesbian school girls ponder sexual reverie and make weird 'outsider lego sheep sculpture. in the conservatory.
?

zipthwung said...

blaze

Paint handling is ok - looser - looser is gooder - less anal than the monstrosly academic early work based on the teachings of some glorified bob ross.here

The new work looks self consciously holly go lighly.
.

I like Robocop, and I can't help thinking about ecological disaster, something that is close to my heart. When I see greenhouses I think soylent green.

Add a headless ethnic body and the dots start to connect, although I think that's more me -

so I feel like this painting might have content, but I'm not convinced that there's a rich inner life - more a desire for one, appart from, say, Robocop.

But does one need a rich inner life to be an artist? Does Alex Katz?

Does one need to envision a dark dystopian future in order to tap into the zeitgeist? Is there an alternative world where the dark underbelly of society is not laid bare like an open sore for all to see? A world where dark ideas are repressed and emerge like nighmares, an abandoned child's bike with it's front wheel still spinning? A baby carriage with three wheels? A greenhouse filled with light, growing living horse heads in vitamin water?

Maybe a "Last Days at Marienbad" Campari ad?

Ahh the good life.

oilybrushes said...

ahhh and here was I starting to think people were just too hungover to talk

no-where-man said...

i am going to go with comment on genetic engineering for 100

oilybrushes said...

wow i just looked at the texas/ lanscapes on the website you suggested and I think some of the work there is amazing, much better that these new works. Like "Careful Pretty" 2005 and "Kate" same year. They are much much smaller works and i think more successful in execution. "Agnes" is virtually devoid of the loose yet complex colour systems + emotional drama of earlier works. perhaps its an issue od scale.

oilybrushes said...

It seems like she's pared down all that was personal in her style to the barely distinguishable. Or second thoughts maybe she's pared down all that was somebody elses style till she found the barest essentials with which to build her own. I'm just talking brush work.

burrito brother said...

Isn't she Paul Verhoeven's kid. You know, 'Showgirls' Paul Verhoeven?

zipthwung said...

oily, - sounds like a good theory. Resume says academic all over it -

New York Academy of Art, New York, NY (MFA)

For example.

If "de skilling" means anything to you, then you could see why going to a place like that might be good as an antidote

I used to think academic painter people were anal retentives with no content to speak of...now I think its more a matter of taste.

Good and Bad.

Robocop

wod zar xam said...

I like the work on her website a lot. She is very dramatic, and at the same time very loose with her figuration. A lot of her earlier work has a sort of theatric sense that the piece "Agnes" seems to lack. I think that is probably a conscious decision for this painting, and I'm eager to see the rest of the show to find out if this is part of a group of similar paintings.

In "Agnes", she is depicting a starkly different world than she had in much of her earlier works. A painting like "Under Swayne", from her nightmares series, is examining the human ethos of the internal existence, where as "Agnes" seems to be investigating the bland, non confrontational experience of modern life as a whole. Her earlier work was often rooted in the hope (belief?) that we posses something intrinsically spiritual and non existential as humans. That our sadness, our joy and fear are powerful, palpable and real enough to paint. That sense is gone from "Agnes". In this painting, we live instead in an insulated greenhouse, blanketed by our plastic casing from the fervent sky. We are haunted by the lost humanity of our past and the creeping creations of our future. Certainly, this is a painting about the end of the natural, and a good one at that. I think it is particularly effective when one reads back into her earlier work to see her more hopeful paintings from times past.

obeyerichongisto said...
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kelli said...

My word for academics and NY Academy of Art artists is chocolodytes. Because they are all sort of troglodytes and they love the color chocolate brown even though it rarely appears in actual old paintings.

oilybrushes said...

thankyou wod

zip,
could you please explain what you mean by "If "de skilling" means anything to you, then you could see why going to a place like that might be good as an antidote."?

brian edmonds said...

Something about those greens and the way the blue seems luminous that gives a nod to Diebenkorn. Not subject at hand of course but something does..

zipthwung said...

I read the term "deskilling" recently - not sure where, but I've seen it before, elsewhere.

Once uppon a time in Europe artists studied rigourously in academies, where they eventually were given a monopoly on a genere to paint and could then make a living painting cats, for example. You could be the most renound painter of felines and get fat and laid a lot.

Obviously some subjects were more prestigious, and were reserved for the best painters. This is where the term "artistic license" came from. To be a big fat painter of great historical moments as if you were there, would be a sweet gig.

For a more scholarly but brief intorduction see Elkins "why art cannot be taught" - it has a priceless picture of a minimal/conceptual artist staring at the concrete floor instead of the geometric abstractions on the wall.

So you see where I'm headed - between the academy and now, there was a shift in the idea of what "skill" in "art" was.

You may have experienced this split as "hippy dippy" vs. "academic" - where "hippy dippy" teachers think art can't be taught, that it is some innate perceptual instinct, that dogmatic rules ruin you as an artist, that you either have "it" or you're a Nagel, a Peter Max, a George Rodrigue, maker of blue dogs.

The academics will tell you that the reason the afore mentioned artists suck is that they dont know HOW to paint, which is a flat out lie. Anyone can learn to paint.

Anyways, universities across the country hired a bunch of conceptual hacks to teach the bulge of GI bill and student loan funded students. The hack teachers, in turn trained conceptual hacks, and so forth.

The upshot being that urban centers were flooded with newly minted conceptual hack clones.

Thats what I gather, anyways.

In reality I think a lot of smart people got duped by a system that couldn't actaully deliver on the promise.

Just like at Woostock.

wod zar xam said...

I'm going to buy a book to read today. Any suggestions?

obeyerichongisto said...
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wod zar xam said...

OA... thanks for the suggestion... maybe i'll pick up his bio on Nathaniel Hawthorne, seems like a good read. Been meaning to check out the biography on DeKooning too.

albino radio1 said...

i like the architecture of this painting, the way the brown haunts the edges, and the shadows enforce the structure of the green. i am very interested in the divisions between the box-like corners of this space. there are no actual lines that do the dividing, the images themselves divide. and if the image can be folded, to what advantage? to have division without lines seems very poetic, and advocates an interesting openness within the enevitable composition a painting will take. what is interesting in this particuliar painting is the greenhouse narrative and the relationship between narrative and openness.

canadian artist said...

mostly boring.
wish i could paint like she can, i would do soemthing better with it

canadian artist said...

mostly boring.
wish i could paint like she can, i would do soemthing better with it

Cross said...

Several comments say that certain paintings give a nod to or refer to or suggest other artists' work. While everyone is influenced by the work of others, the original artist will not just "nod to" a style. He or she will jump into it full force and push it ahead or improve it in a visionary way. I like art that adds to the pool. Nodding is only about selling.

cam'ron said...

i will be the downfall of this retarded website

Pasha Kocherzhenko said...

cool)