6/15/2006

Mamma Andersson

46 comments:

Painter said...

Mamma Andersson
@ David Zwiner
525 West 19th Street (between 10th Ave. and West St.)
New York, NY 10011

Painter said...

I am going to be posting some non New York painters in the summer.

JD said...

I liked this show. It sort of had that faint palette and touch that reminded me of Luc Tuymans, but the imagery and associations were totally different. She had some large split panels, in which the seam became a kind of horizon line in the landscape, sometimes acting like the line where water meets land, with that kind of reflection where everything above is right side up and everything below is upside down.

Cross said...

Refreshing to look at. Doesn't require thinking, just feeling. Most contemporary work (including mine) REQUIRES so much of the viewer. Sometimes it's good to look at something like this that just offers itself up, without pretense.

Mark said...

I liked them better after a second visit. Wasn't too keen on the paint, but it works. They are refreshing. Outside NYC painters? Hmmm.

mr.wakeup said...

it's involved and pleasing to look at in an early 20th century way/ 15th century way /palette...

i'm enjoying it because it seems (perhaps i hope) well-crafted... and it is delicate with little abstractions in the trees and throughout

this lures me ... even though I am not into this subject matter for the most part

i'll be checking it out soon...

mr.wakeup said...

it lures me even though i am not into this subject matter.

it is reminiscent of early 20th century works/ 15th century palette... it is involved& delicate with little abstractions thoughout the trees and all..

it seems, i perhaps hope, well-crafted/well done and is why I pause to look closely...

will check it out beyond the jpeg...

Burgerder said...

I don't appreciate this work. It's not pretentious enough for me. i like thinking. i particularly don't like country corner realism paintings of the contemporary art world. (check out the web site) pretending to be a conceptual take. just because it's a painting of video. that just smirking at the contemporary art world. well, i could go on and on.

epilepticadam said...

it may seem well done, which gets it into a particular tier of art these days ( i believe many abstract works fall into this catagory as well)

i like to think as well Burgerder, although i don't equate it with pretentiousness...

it is too straightfoward for me... and it may get a larger audience because it seems to be' well done'

dubz said...

hey burgerder, these are not paintings of videos. where did you get that info?

andersson's paintings are SO swedish... landscape tradition with feelings of isolation and a strong connection to the natural world. they appear foreign and somewhat traditional because we aren't connected to the same things here in the US...

JD said...

WW, is her name really Mamma?

zipthwung said...

I like Mark Tansey better, he's pretentious, and his paint is so thin...plus he uses(d) stuff like tinfoil and paper to "rag" the paint -additive/subtractive.

And hes in the moma.

zipthwung said...

I mean the met.

no-where-man said...

comfort food, show kinda made me homesick - i am a sucker for face value.

Cooky Blaha said...

fuck mark tansey

dubz said...

hi jd! her real name is karin.

the work is so subtle. she uses a beautiful monoprinting technique that makes for memory-jogging weirdness. they are slow and sweet and personal.

PinkandlacePony said...

Where did the Mamma come from?
I love it. Like Grandma Moses.

zipthwung said...

cooky,

got milk?

You know that shit about Derrida and deconstruction and how the signifier is not the signified, therefore the shadow and shit like that?

I still don't get it.

Sign me:

Carton

dubz said...

pinkandlacepony: stockholm

JpegCritic said...

Pony,
She's married to Jockum Nordstrum.
One can see the interchange...
...Within the Zwirner stable.

JpegCritic said...

I meant interplay.

dubz said...

dude, call it interchange... but it's more than that... it's a swedish thing. an aesthetic. it's somehow built in, like the german precision thing.

JpegCritic said...

Agreed W.W.!

albino radio1 said...

the symmetry 'breaks the grid,' if you will, in this ptng titled 'backwoods,' and becomes non-diagramitical (which i think charges any image w/ emotion). the two villages/house clusters mirror each other.

i'm pretty into the accessibility of the space as a whole, i can manuever the expance in what feels a 3D fashion. i'm also into where i'm standing: on some other hill, or perhaps a highway that runs past this beautiful farming village.

i'd like to see this setting as a summe ptng!

JpegCritic said...

zipthwung,
I think it had to do with the question
of whether or not paul is really dead
and whether or not william shears
was just as good as the real thing.

zipthwung said...

This painting is very brown. Reminds me of my first painting class (watercolor) and I used a lot of green because everything was green. THen I learned about local color, and how people see differently, and then I figured out you could have a style apart from skill level. That blew my fucking mind.

...can't buy me lunch....but...all you need is cash.

zipthwung said...

Also, I hate the country. Bland dreary and undifferentiated - especially in the winter. Jesus christ. Where I grew up the clouds were about a hundred feet above your head, which is skull crushingly low if you ask me.
that's why the plains indians painted themselves. THe Lakota even painted their ponies, if you know what I mean.

check this shit out

wild.

closeuup said...

It's so folky, with modern subject matter and bric a brac. I like my landscapes less scratchy, more smooth. Like the one I live in.

Like that one "About a Girl" Dare I say the best thing about scandanavians is the way they look?

closeuup said...

Whos that guy Carl Larsson? Thru to Althoff. Folky.

chicomacho said...

the mavs will definitely win tonight, there is no way dwayne wade is going to score another 40 points. The heat played their hearts out and Wade had a near perfect performance and they still barely won the game. ITS OVER

no-where-man said...

omg! the swedish thing thats it! i was just thinking it does not remind me that much of where i grew up i wonder y i feel that way, then that comment triggered it! my first girlfriend was right off the boat swedish and her folks had these landscapes (maybe on fabric of some kind) and a puzzle under a piece of glass on the coffee table with landscapes that not looked but felt a hell of alot like this show - in fact her whole house did.

painterdog said...

you people make my head hurt.
Lucian Freud now there's a painter...

painterdog said...

oh boy that painting is not very good...
but I am looking at on the web.
Nothing wrong with landscape painting.
Turner was great, all the Japanese ukiyo-e view prints.

And lets not forget Geroge Innes.
Now I'm getting to traditional for u all..

JpegCritic said...

Barkeep!...

Vlahos Boyiajees said...

Liked this show a lot. It's nice to see someone in today's scene that isn't afraid of a presenting a rather direct lanscape painting. This painting pictured wasn't my favorite though. "About a Girl"
(2005) is my favorite. There is just something beyond your typical Tuymens' snapshot-to-painting going on in these works. I felt significant psychological tension with her work. A sense of incompleteness which I feel most people feel in their lives if they are honest. This anxiety is important to me. Not to get all faux-spiritual here. Some painters know how to do it and others just make paintings that attempt to capture this.
Andersson makes me forget I'm looking at a painting and draws me into her fragmented/cold, yet welcoming, world. Haven't seen a painter this year at Zwirner I didn't like yet. Nice glow in that gallery too.

closeuup said...

cut n paste

http://www.latribunedelart.com/Expositions_2004/Whistler_-_Nocturne2.JPG

I like a landscape with attitude

no-where-man said...

what is it About a Girl.

sloth said...

I agree with ww. I really liked this show; went back to see it again and got more out of it the second time. Not much work out there gives as much. There are a lot of moments in her paintings where process and decision are apparent without sacrificing a sense of place. They seem really invented & arrived-at.

Her approach is consistently un-fussy... she knows how to walk away & resist the urge to "finish," so the work has an openness & directness that plays against the palette and subject matter.

I think she's pretty great. Quietly radical.

tumbleweed said...

Now this is the sort of painting my maman would like. Peculiar.

No, I don't like this. Forgettably straight-forward. As soon as I look away from the browser I forget what it looks like abstractly and all I can remember about this is "snowy muddy hillside."
There isn't enought happening for me in the palette, compostion, whatever to keep me interested. Repetitive little houses...

Though sometimes I wish tripledisel's habit of posting more than one painting in each entry would continue, as when I looked up the rest of Mamma Anderson's work I was surprised. Very different, at least.

And I am delighted to hear some non-NYC painters will make it up here! You have to do some London and Paris painters, I hope.

Vlahos Boyiajees said...

Go Argentina!!!

Vlahos Boyiajees said...

"About a Girl" can be viewed here : http://www.davidzwirner.com/exhibitions/115/work_2141.htm

prop said...

i disagree with the straight foward direct landscape comments. these are a lot more patient than that. they feel like they've been looked at for a long period and as a viewer, i think that translates into seeing them slowly and having a story sort of roll out over time

if fairfield porter lived somewhere with 20 hours of daylight i'd imagine this to be something along the lines of what he'd paint

no-where-man said...

Vlahos Boyiajees, thx! went to the opening - i am a horrible writer, ment what is it about that painting something really draws me in,- everyone should check it out.

closeuup said...

prop--can you tell me how those "monoprinted" textures, which seem quite random to me, relate to your comments about patience and looking. These paintings don't seem to be about observation of nature. which is probably a good thing in this day and age. or not?

closeuup said...

"what is it about a girl?"

I knew what you meant ;)

prop said...

i meant it as considered and decisive. i think she probably spent a good amount of time looking at and thinking about each canvas, thoughtfully making decisions while painting them. although the porter comment was in reference to how light is used by both of them--it doesn't refer to direct observation.

people have always and will continue to make art about what they see