1/16/2007

Carrie Moyer

36 comments:

Painter said...

Carrie Moyer @
Canada
55 Chrystie St
(between Hester & Canal),
NYC NY 10002

poppy said...

do you have to be canadian to show at this gallery?
saw this on the other site and looked up gallery to see her other work.
I dont find this particular comp very strong... bottom of painting is very distracting. those little feet things. the leggy feet things work better in other work...

Martin said...

FINALLY! I like her stuff a lot... she was one of the favorites at the big Tang Museum painting survey.

Thousand Points of Light said...

I have not seen the show, but my first impression is that the political underpinnings of her past paintings have fallen out for some reason. That may not be to the benefit of the paintings, not sure. The play against 'primitive kitsch' seems less compelling.

I like Canada gallery, and I like the fact that they are showing this artist.

Anonymous said...

i don't think the political underpinnings have disappeared whatsoever - the imagery in this recent group of paintings all seem to reference early feminist painting genres of goddess and central core imagery through her familiar graphic abstraction.

zipthwung said...

Strong endorsement indeed TPL! It is not I that will douse this spirit neath the flames of flamery!

Canada had the COURAGE of its CONVICTIONS to stay off the beaten track in the gritty Lower East Village! Amen to that! Leo Koenig didnt have the balls to stay down on centre street. Too much gunfire and drug use. If you like Canada and you like their artists, then its worth a special trip down there. Brink a flack jacket and a can of mace.

I should like the artists and their work, because of my totally ANTI stance. But I dont think they are totally anti. I think THEY are totally for the ANTS because its makes me antsy. Follow the formic acid, i say, theres bound to be sugar at the end of the paragraph.

“Not "Seeing is Believing," you ninny, but "Believing is Seeing." For modern art has become completely literary: the paintings and other works exist only to illustrate the text.”

-TOm Wolfe

zipthwung said...

Also - what artists today are ertoticizing fear successfully? Name your top pick(s).

Thanks in advance.

Cooky Blaha said...

looked better online no offence; they look like photo collage in jpeg, more normal in person

zipthwung said...

can I supersize you today?

Anonymous said...

Clinton Fein at ToomeyTourell. Their website never works right. Hope you can see it.

heidilolatheayatollah said...

erotocizing fear successfully?
hmm interesting question....

Cooky Blaha said...

lets toast:
http://youtube.com/watch?v=sfW8X4o7T9I

Anonymous said...

angela fraleigh

zipthwung said...

white russian

Anonymous said...

Georgia O'Keeffe comes to mind, though these are decidedly more empyrean, classic Greek? ... before color!

http://www.artchive.com/artchive/O/okeefe.html

poppy said...

what artists are actually fearful and attempt to express this? please list these as well

Anonymous said...

what keeps mankind alive?

Anonymous said...

is anyone in nyc not afraid of some form of attack?

fyi,- For anyone who blogs - there is a host called imeem you use it to create playlists of your own or sample others to host audio, video or images then are then really easy to add to myspace or your blog.

Anonymous said...

oops sorry

imeem

poppy said...

I'd just like to see some examples of painters that are painting from a place of fear or trying to express this. if anyone can give a few examples i'd like to look them up,.recent painters.
zips comment made me curious about this..so if anyone has a couple names it would be most appreciated.

Cooky Blaha said...

sean landers
http://www.andrearosengallery.com/artists/sean-landers/

zipthwung said...

You know, the color and stuff reminds me of childrens books - the arty ones A Maya Angelou book or something.

(No one I knew growning up owned fine art and I mostly just remember a particular isamu naguchi....I dont remember thinking it was awesome - just that it was tactile, like a jungle jim).

"I must not fear. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my fear. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain."

zipthwung said...

Re Sean Landers - It is not the thing you fear that you must fear - it is the mother of the thing you fear.

Ware the gruffalo.

Cooky Blaha said...

re the coloring book:

http://www.powells.com/biblio?isbn=0867193719

zipthwung said...

vagina dentata

Anonymous said...

i like this painter. i'm cautiously optimistic in thinking she'll get better and better. in three-shows' time, she could even become utterly original. while i don't like every choice she makes in painting, i understand my distates as personal, meaning there's nothing intrinsically wrong with the paintings, i just like chocolate more than kiwi.

Martin said...

poppy - about the fear artists... that is triggering a memory of someone i think who once specifically said that... i will try to remember.

AH, i just got it! Kusama Yayoi.

Anonymous said...

so many things to fear--terror, starvation, women fear men and apparently men fear women!

i gave her my heart but she wanted my soul dont think twice its alright

dont think twice indeed

zipthwung said...

Rick: I stick my neck out for nobody.
Louis: Wise foreign policy.

zipthwung said...

But whats puzzling you
Is the nature of my game

Anonymous said...

can't keep a good neck down

zipthwung said...

fresh!

poppy said...

sean landers is def afraid of not being accepted by art world, i guess that'll do.

ec said...

Louise Bourgeois, don't abandon me pillows...Joy Garnett, the political images...in some weird way, Brian Calvin, his people always look numb.

friknidjit said...

pleeze, will someone just fuck tom wolfe?

NYTIMESREVIEW said...

Published: February 2, 2007

CARRIE MOYER

The Stone Age, New Paintings
Canada
55 Chrystie Street, near Hester Street, Lower East Side
Through Feb. 11

Carrie Moyer’s paintings are bracing blasts from several pasts and look surprisingly contemporary because of the deliberation with which they are made. Starting with the elegant earthiness of raw, unbleached canvas, Ms. Moyer builds thin, levitating strata of contrasting colors, forms and techniques, each with its own set of historical, stylistic and physical references.

Crisp shapes and negative silhouettes often evoke prehistoric goddess statues, rock formations or ceramic vessels. Translucent pours of color suggest natural streams, menstrual blood and the male-dominated history of formalist painting, while textures applied in expanses of hand or finger prints allude to cave paintings but also to 1970s feminism (especially the hand-printed paintings of Harmony Hammond).
Throughout, 1980s appropriation strategies, especially as they descend from Philip Taaffe, are pulverized and recast. In “Furbelow,” Ms. Moyer brings out the inner goddess of a curving Jomon period Japanese vase by adding hints of nipples to its top. Meanwhile “Old Flame,” an ancient brazier that is also a figure, is engulfed in a slow burn of color that suggests unquenched desire.
Ms. Moyer shares her penchant for precision layering with Stephen Mueller and her ambiguous figurative abstraction with Nicola Tyson. The combination of weightlessness and inner light is more singular and almost photographic in effect; it announces that everything is on purpose and accents a pervasive feminism that is both primordial and ineffably elegant.

There’s a cautious quality to Ms. Moyer’s precision that she will need to face, but for the moment the sense of looking all the way through to the back of her paintings, and deep into history, is very impressive. ROBERTA SMITH