11/07/2006

Kaye Donachie

31 comments:

Painter said...

Kaye Donachie @
John Connelly Presents
625 West 27th
NYC 10001

Painter said...

Don't forget to vote.

Cooky Blaha said...

hi luc.

exu said...

painted with cadaverine?

closeuup said...

I dont know anything about the painter or work but Id say that's a portrait of a beautiful ghost. Ill look into it.

So I already voted-no on everything-no arnold, no condos, no dems, no repubs, no schools, no freeways, NO Nuthing! Ahh that feels so good.

zipthwung said...

taste
matters.

The last two paintings havve a self simularity in the posatmodern meta sense. Tell me Im wrong. Knowing, knowing, gone! TO the lowest common denominator! Get thee to a nunnery! Or a whorehouse! Ill be down in a minute!

More art from photographs. We wore onions on our belts because it was style of the time....

Whos the lady watercolorist from apartheid that went tripple platinum with satchi? Marlene, darling.

Check this out- two men enter, one man leave -Baudrillard, as a member of the legion, I sentence you to ride backwards into the desert of the real. You intellectual parasite -or is that "fraud". Ecco too. How far back does postmodernism go? Lascaux?:

Baudrillard:

"What can the army do with simulators? Traditionally, following a direct principle of identification, it unmasks and punishes them. Today, it can reform an excellent simulator as though he were equivalent to a "real" homosexual, heart-case or lunatic. Even military psychology retreats from the Cartesian clarifies and hesitates to draw the distinction between true and false, between the "produced" symptom and the authentic symptom. "If he acts crazy so well, then he must be mad." Nor is it mistaken: in the sense that all lunatics are simulators, and this lack of distinction is the worst form of subversion.

but heres another author- or is it baudrillard?

"the desert, that infinity where there is nothing. It’s fundamentally the white page. My questioning, my obsession with the book, may very well have been born from that white page, which becomes written. I never thought of a Mallarm√©an book, of a totality. To think of a book in advance, as a project, is to limit it. The book for me should be without limits, like the desert, thus an exploded book.

-Jabies, 1980

Whats a poor poet maudit to do? My cat is catching a mouse, and I have caught a thief!

heidilolatheayatollah said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
zipthwung said...

Ideal Worlds: New Romanticism in Contemporary Art
Max Hollein and Martina Weinhart
304 pages Colour and B&W reproductions. ISBN 3775715908

17.5 x 23 cm English/German text. Hardcover

The longing for paradise: Romanticism rediscovered in artists' studios all over the world.

In an age of increasing mobility and dissolving social bonds, the yearning for intimacy and security is growing steadily stronger in Western society. Plagued by uncertainty in the face of social and political systems in turmoil and a sense of vulnerability generated by reports of war and horrific images of terror, many people turn away from reality in search of safe havens and perspectives of hope.

This trend is also reflected in contemporary visual art. A new spirit of Romanticism is being revived in earnest by a number of young painters and in the key media of the post-modern world, such as photography, and installation art-expressions of a longing for beauty, paradise, and fictional, fairy-tale worlds. Emphasis on the individual and individual feelings goes hand in hand with a reawakening of interest in the landscape and its symbolic qualities as an appropriate image of our prevailing mood.

Presenting works by some thirteen artists, this publication traces the development of the New Romanticism in contemporary art.

Artists featured: Hernan Bas, Peter Doig, Kaye Donachie, Uwe Henneken, Justine Kurland, Catherine Opie, Christopher Orr, Laura Owens, David Thorpe, Christian Ward


Price: £24.95

OUT OF STOCK

zipthwung said...

How Latitudes Become Forms: Art in a Global Age
Ed. Philippe Vergne
Walker Art Center 2003

352 pages Colour and B&W reproductions. ISBN 0935640738

23 x 28 cm English text. Softcover

The rise of globalism has created tremendous challenges to old economic, political, and cultural paradigms, and these changes are reflected in artistic practices. Disciplinary boundaries are crossed as easily as geographical ones. How does the new internationalism that we are facing affect aesthetics and artistic production? Is there a link, for example, between the rise of video works and the global availability of the digital medium? Does the global information age facilitate an "international language of art" and an alternative reading of art history, toward art histories?

From the perspective of a museum of modern and contemporary art, the institution has to overcome a major contradiction: between its mission of permanence and its mission of change. How can cultural institutions contribute to the revamping of their own structures now that the hegemony of western modernity is being challenged? How can museums connect with new audiences through different practices, different scholarship, and different interpretative strategies growing out of the sedimentation of their history?


Price: £22.50

OUT OF STOCK

I dont know but I think it might be watercolor, but not like watercolor, more like big pond color, locally, you know? I dont know.

DOnt shoot untill you see the whites of their eyes, is all I can say.

zipthwung said...

For Discussion
• Look closely at this small painting. What is the focal point? How does
Donachie create a sense of distance? Which parts are painted in the
most detail? Can you see any brushwork?
• What ‘type’ of people are depicted in Epiphany? What is a commune
or cult? Discuss examples of rebellious and revolutionary groups.
What is a utopian community? Why do you think Donachie is so
interested in these people?
• Donachie’s paintings are based on found images from film and
photographic footage. Discuss the pros and cons of a painter using
images from other sources.
• Donachie believes that painting is an appropriate medium through
which to probe beliefs and all their paradoxes. Do you agree? What
other mediums might be more/less appropriate?
• Why do you think this painting is called Epiphany? Do you think the
mood of the painting is pessimistic, optimistic or neither?
Activities
• Painting from found images. Develop project work based on found
images such as photographs, magazines, CD covers and film stills.
Encourage students to analyse and distil these images (photocopying,
collaging and re-photographing them) to create their own paintings.
• Use film and historical biography as a starting point for a project.
Encourage students to develop paintings and/or cartoon illustrations
documenting an individual or community they have researched.

chicomacho said...

sweet luc tuymans!

oh, wait, shes the that worked for peter doig, thats why the paintings look like that.....

zipthwung said...

Attitude, you got some fucking attitude
I cant believe what you said to me
You got some attitude

Inside your feeble brain theres probably a whore
If you dont shut your mouth youre gonna feel the floor

Attitude, the one you got, oh baby
Attitude, the one you got, oh baby
Attitude, attitude

Inside your feeble brain theres probably a whore
If you dont shut your mouth youre gonna feel the floor

Attitude, you got some fucking attitude
(attitude) I cant believe what you said to me
You got some attitude

Attitude, you got some fucking attitude
(attitude) I cant believe what you said to me
You got some attitude

Thousand Points of Light said...

How does it work to have nostalgia for something you never experienced? Born 1970?

I think Michael Bracewell locates nostalgia for anybody post-1960's in: When Surface Was Depth: Death by Cappuccino and Other Reflections on Music and Culture in the 1990's.

This work seems like hand-me-down nostalgia, and doesn't quite gel for me.

KISSMYABSTRACT said...

http://www.artforum.com/diary/

Did Jerry dis Matthew Barney ?Did I read that right?

zipthwung said...

TPOL, greed is good. What do you care?
I grew up on an ashram of one. Im not nostalgic. Not even for the times that never were. Not even for the gutter mud. Nor even for nostalgia. How can you miss something you never had?

Pure surface brah. Im surfing the rhizome RIGHT NOW. No, now. I dont read, I meditate. I dont have a narrative, I have an attitude. I dont move, the world moves through me. History curled up and died in my spleen.

History repeats itself as farce, but now, now is history, is farce. Eat and excrete within ten feet, thats the greater mott.

Can farce be sincere? Oh yes. But what good is farce if there is no boogyman? No pinkerton. Bat man to the joker?

Its a sad scene when the farce is the farce. That means death is death and art is arse.

burrito brother said...

I'm the very last person to like anything remotely 'academic' looking, but this was actually a pretty great show of beautiful paintings, regardless of the subject matter. It did make me think about nostalgia, idealism and longing in a melancholy way. Are we afraid of all these things today?

Thousand Points of Light said...

Zip:

You're reading too much Baudrillard, but I have to admit his little diatribe on war- The Intelligence of Evil or the Lucidity Pact- is pretty much right on target.

BB:
I think we are drowning in nostalgia, idealism and longing right now. We're just too bright and shiny to realize it.

no-where-man said...

humm.. KMA i ment to go to that but halloween took it out of me. how was it? i noticed Jerry was not in No Restraint, - lovers spat?

mr peeps said...

yikes another one for the zwirnerplex. this is like part borremans, part kilimnik, part tuymans, part peyton, whatEVER. so sick of tender germanish fake nostalgia. yuch.

Anonymous said...

Reminds me of 1. Dumas 2. German painting from the 70's and early 80's
3. somewhat Richter like with the quick but calculated strokes

no-where-man said...

Tobias said of the Richter approching block that in one single brush stroke you prob. could detect up to 800 diff. colours - is this true of the Donachie?

zipthwung said...

what you talkin' bout willis?

no-where-man said...

Lot 22 Gerhard Richter (video starts at 7:34) if Tobias Meyer pitches it it must be true!. don't shatter my world.

closeuup said...

Hey I liked that video. Tobias is from Central Casting, no? I think he was exaggerating about 800 tho.

no-where-man said...

heh, i like it when he caress's the David Smith, the whole time the show was at the gugg. i kept wanting to do that.

closeuup said...

yea--HE gets to touch it. i laughed when he did that too.

no-where-man said...

well they are made to be touched... just not in a indoor muse. soft core porn i hear!

George said...

I brought up Monet in response to ‘too many colors’ and didn’t mean to inject him into the discussion of Anrather’s paintings.
Redon was a side flash to a postcard of one of his paintings someone had sent me. He might be a useful source for her but I don’t think her paintings look like Redon.

As I see it, the danger zone in Anrather’s paintings is her tendency to slip into cuteness or the use of gratuitous decorative elements.
It’s not that I have a specific problem with the deers in the paintings but I would like to see her broaden out her range of subject and not become trapped as a ‘cute animal painter’

I disagree with the negative remarks about her use of color. That is not to say that I don’t think it could be improved but I feel she is a painter with a good color sense. The color in the paintings feels intuitively resolved and not based upon theory.

I also feel the asymmetry of the two deers is what makes the painting work, symmetrically executed it would be a bust.

Anrather strikes me as being a gifted painter. I think she needs a little more time to develop the exact direction the paintings take and to toughen them up a bit.

George said...

I brought up Monet in response to ‘too many colors’ and didn’t mean to inject him into the discussion of Anrather’s paintings.
Redon was a side flash to a postcard of one of his paintings someone had sent me. He might be a useful source for her but I don’t think her paintings look like Redon.

As I see it, the danger zone in Anrather’s paintings is her tendency to slip into cuteness or the use of gratuitous decorative elements.
It’s not that I have a specific problem with the deers in the paintings but I would like to see her broaden out her range of subject and not become trapped as a ‘cute animal painter’

I disagree with the negative remarks about her use of color. That is not to say that I don’t think it could be improved but I feel she is a painter with a good color sense. The color in the paintings feels intuitively resolved and not based upon theory.

I also feel the asymmetry of the two deers is what makes the painting work, symmetrically executed it would be a bust.

Anrather strikes me as being a gifted painter. I think she needs a little more time to develop the exact direction the paintings take and to toughen them up a bit.

heidilolatheayatollah said...

I visited 12 shows in Chelsea and this was by far the standout show.

They are very thinly painted, almost washy and the colors she puts together are risky but they make me believe the space. And her drawings were really beautiful, design-y with old master drawing influences.
Sometimes they looked more like color sketches than fully realized paintings, but maybe that is not so bad, to leave them in the unresolved potential zone.

This is one of the shows that really has to be seen in person, her earlier work of empty sterile spaces was a huge departure from this, this is sooo much better. It made me think she was given accolades first and then grew into it and is now doing the strong work. This show was 1 of the only 2 saving graces amongst the 12.

heidilolatheayatollah said...

Dear Kaye,
If you ever read this --just a note to let you know I think your work is beautiful and ethereal. I can't wait to see what you do next.
kudos!