10/06/2006

Greg Bogin

79 comments:

Painter said...

Greg Bogin @
Leo Koenig
545 West 23rd Street
NYC

flyover_land said...

This one also looks like a textbook cover, or maybe a Trapper Keeper. I can see it printed on a glossy card stock as a flashcard. It makes me want to do some ball point pen doodles in the middle there. These comments are meant to be complimentary.

bluebalz said...

really boring art. corporate but i guess thats the idea.

Thousand Points of Light said...

these paintings remind me of Bart Exposito's paintings in both subject and construction.

As much as I'm drawn to this work, its direct, seemingly unmediated relationship with its subject matter strikes me as too simplistic to hold interest after the initial, graphic punch.

Frank Nitsche's paintings (rep. by Leo Koening) seem to do better work with graphic inspiration. the painterly transformation of graphic material in this way in more inspiring to me.

I'll end up seeing the show, and perhaps my take will change.

Cross said...

I immediately thought of a Richard Tuttle piece I saw this week. It was a piece of rope about 3 inches long nailed to the wall about two & a half feet up from the floor.

This painting has more color of course.

(and what's a Trapper Keeper?)

flyover_land said...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trapper_Keeper

zipthwung said...

Pee Chee. Graphic design=art. Stripes as mediated by the roller rink mural.

sans cullotes

Daniel Buren. Institutional critique
Viva la Revolution.

Paul Fussel in his book class talks about "generation x"

whats that all about?

painterdog said...

very 70's graphic design.

Scott Taylor said...

I'm still hung up on "What is a Trapper Keeper?". Mine had a impossible form that was a triangle over a weird landscape.

no-where-man said...

automative lacquer does not translate well online nor does scale.

gazinia said...

I didn't experience anything seeing these paintings in person that I don't experience seeing them reproduced.

Richard Tuttle's way out of Bogin's league.

zipthwung said...

to say Tuttle way out of his league is like saying Mickey Mantle is no Oleg Zandersson or something.

Hows the african bob sled team doing these days?

dubz said...

tuttle's a MAJOR snore.

bogin's work makes you feel insignificant. i think he's on to something. seeing them in person is totally different than viewing a jpeg and critical to the work. they don't function as paintings... they're really sculptures; signs. to me, they are creepy symbols of future processes that use familiar, retro motifs to make you think you recognize them... sort of.

zipthwung said...

TO me they reference the current trend in animated ribbons in broadcast graphics or "motion design"

THey would go good bookending (in "bumpers") to < a href="http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=5615212328010933613">

gazinia said...

Mickey Mantle=Richard Tuttle
Oleg Zandersson=Greg Bogin

I'll go with that.

There's nothing interesting about these paintings up close (flatly applied industrial paint) and the only difference when viewed in person is their scale. I can use my imagination for that. What stands out for me is what dubz said -- the pseudo-familiar graphic motif and also the shaped canvas thing. That's not enough -- too cold and boring for me.

Scott Taylor said...

I agree gaz. I want to see a painting not a sign. On the positive end, they would look great in a retro modern bulding or house which is where they will end up. Familiarity is a tricky thing like the Trapper Keeper question. They may resonate with a particular group.

kelli said...

A lot of Painter's recent posts need to be seen in person. These are notable for their formal beauty in that they do not have the kind of hard perfection most hard edged abstraction does. They have a sort of delicate porcelain perfection where in a strange way you actually can see the artist's hand. That and the subtle humor and gentle pop culture references.

zipthwung said...

oh nou ya doont keeley! Weeeel nibble im down to is wishbone wee will!

But DOonald Kuuuuspit is for peotreeey. and so am aye!

Oh and you IDIOTS, all paitnings are signs. Signifying nothing! Get thee to a nuunery!

closeuup said...

Says my aul' wan to your aul' wan
"We got no beef or mutton
If we went up to Monto town
We might get a drink for nuttin'"
Here's a nice piece of advice
I got from an aul' fishmonger:
"When food is scarce and you see the hearse
You'll know you have died of hunger."

zipthwung said...

the kids

need a guineass

Its obversive.

zipthwung said...

entered

apprentice

pixelated

centipede

brent hallard said...

I've only seen jpgs of the work. it seems in installation shots they are quite lurid, brash, and, well, I wont get all sensitive---into that kind of speak.
This jpeg tells me a very different story: if I were 47 feet I'd look upon them as a bit of stationary design, or a small sketch, OR.
I guess it's in the OR.

I like perceptions dressed in the lurid-perfection hidden.


... in the story of Jack and the weave of fine silken cloth, Jack would spin and weave a thread into a fine silk cloth every day. At the end of each day he'd unravel it. The next he'd start fresh, spinning, weaving, the threat. Jack Pot was his name. Most people called him a 'crack pot'.

'not in the thing, but how it is touched'

tomas said...

Kelli- which of painter's recent posts did you feel really needed to be seen in person?

kelli said...

Tomas a few: Wendy White because of painterly qualities, Barnaby Whitfield because of the delicacy of the pastel surface and Barnaby Furnas because the epic quality doesn't translate at all in jpeg. The last especially.

beadelog said...

These seemed like updated sol lewitt. I dunno, sparkly autobody paint looks a hell of a lot better on sheet metal and bondo.

George said...

Bogin’s new paintings have a major problem. They don’t look like they are supposed to. Where’s the bravado wet into wet brushmark, the cute teen age angst, the overt sexuality, the junk from the dime store, the cynical social commentary or some other marko-meaning best described starting with "deals with or explores…"? His paintings don’t even try to look like retrograde art the way Karen Dow’s do. There’s a real problem here, they don’t look like everything else. They aren’t even painted by hand no personal gesture here. They’re sprayed with high gloss, candy colored, metalflaked auto paint, shades of NASCAR, bullnosed, and buffed to a detailers luster. They can’t be signs, they don’t say anything or sell anything they just exist there on the wall in their polygonal "porcelain perfection" timewarp. They look really unfashionable, like plaid pants in a room full of hipsters dressed in all NY black.

Maybe he’s on to something.

dharmabum said...

maybe not

closeuup said...

I was thinkn that george-- how un-NY this painting is. Dont forget all this car culture art has been done eons ago in Cali by everyone from Robert Irwin to Von Dutch. Even Judy Chicago used to do some pin-striping.

You-re right...art where the meaning comes right out of the materials is beautiful in a deep way. Commie

George said...

Yeh, the car culture, California dreaming in the 60’s. I see the relationship but Bogin’s paintings seem to originate from a different impulse. I dislike his earlier work but think the new paintings are headed in the right direction. His fascination with the commercial-cultural icon, the logo, gets his way when the reference or resemblance is too strong, after all, they’re just paintings. They work best when they just insist on themselves as objects of unknown origin, the outer space reference is apt.

Cooky Blaha said...

Anybody see the back room at andrea rosen? Matthew Ritchie show was kinda shite but nigel cooke had some nice small watercolors in the back among other things.

zipthwung said...

THis si better than the matthew ritchie. Wheel within a wheel my ass. Beees! I didnt see the secret passage to the watercolors. Too busy looking at the rubes waiting to climb Jacobs ladder. Jesus.

turkeyvulture said...

This work is better than a raging case of crabs or maybe a handfull of dogshit and that's about all. psuedo-academic, non-commital, I'm sure your parents are proud and not at all embarrassed. A painting is not art just because its on a wall in a gallery. and this makes me feel bad. good night you lazy dicks

no-where-man said...

nigel cooke's sweet.

cadmiumredlite said...

matthew ritchie show the WORST in chelsea right now, boring, arrogant, retreaded material, same colors, same tired cosmology of the universe, crowded, i think it is a case of someone who feels whatever he does will be lauded, but sorry not this time. and the stairway, what was up with that, didnt bother to climb up. sorry off topic but gheez

tomas said...

Kelli- I saw the Furnas show. We feel differently about it. For me the only difference between seeing the jpeg and seeing the paintings is that seeing the paintings made his grandiosity clear. It was like being shouted at by someone cagey, but not that smart.

tomas said...

That red painting was about 30 feet wide.

zipthwung said...

the good work

I signed up some some bougie wagon train to stripe land. Yep. We got enough lard biscuits and beans to last us eight days and a sweet walk cycle.

zipthwung said...

Heres a good laugh:

October 13 - November 13, 2006
OPENING: Friday, October 13, 7 - 9pm

The art world of today appears to be dangling between the real thing and the superficial. Barry Hoggard and James Wagner, the curators of this show, have invited a small diverse group of artists whose work is about what they think and feel, and whose artistic vision is not bent toward what they think the market wants this month or this year.

++++++++++++++++++++++

If the show is 100% feeling I dont know what Ill do.

zipthwung said...

warm up your library cards!

zipthwung said...

Something borrowed something blue, something black and something foo

On the road again; whats love got to do with it.

closeuup said...

boo

closeuup said...

http://bitrot.net/images/blog/tumbleweed.jpg

zipthwung said...

the dude abides

zipthwung said...

"Modernity is the transitory, the fugitive, the contingent, which make up one half of art, the other being the eternal and the immutable. This transitory fugitive element, which is constantly changing, must not be despised or neglected.

10-4 good buddy, over

Cooky Blaha said...

zip post some homunculus art

no-where-man said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
no-where-man said...

seeing them in person does matter - the surface does matter - the reflections, as does the shinneyness and angle. they have as much in common with sculpture as painting.

closeuup said...

either-or

cathy said...

take a look. its in a book. reading rainbow.

closeuup said...

but is it rock n roll

traderguy said...

John McCracken meets Elsworth Kelly with sort of neo-Pop overtones- this is so different from the last twenty/thirty whatever posts here it must mean he is doing something right and original - and you do have to see it in the flesh. In fact that anyone can comment on any work on this site without having seen it in the flesh is just ridiculous.

painterdog said...

how so?

kelli said...

P dog it's a strange surface more like a Flemish eggshell surface than a taped off hard and precise Sarah Morris surface.

zipthwung said...

"In fact that anyone can comment on any work on this site without having seen it in the flesh is just ridiculous."

Ridiculous!
I have it on good authority that the surface is not flawless, in the international style, so/but is possibly a post colonial critique, although signs point to no.

But I'd be interested to know if the snark is in fact a snark and not in fact, a boogum. You tell me.

I think its more intersting to critique this as a critique of the recent (or am i imagining things) "market putsch" towards sublime landscape painting. Although that is in effect a shallow (and short!) interrogation of the market, such as it is, as it were.

BUt this is all just false media in the service of the beaurocrats of emotion!

Need one think about this piece as if we were mini-neitches plumbing the sublime shallows of the will to the golden mediocrity?

Or shall we instead profess our truest feelings in the face of this canny mirage?

Does this painting mask quiet desperation behind a positivist mask? A blood flood welled up behind an enameled heart plug?

Shall we pull the mighty drain chain and see if the ocean pours forth, an untidy expidition to an unmanifested destiny, inchoate?

Or shall we scornfully mock THE WORK as if it is the creation of a naive child, the lucky shot od an uncoordinated nerd, a stochastic dribble against the backboard of the universe?

What arena, what rule? What eye; wet or dry?

kelli said...

You brought up a good point before about mini nitches and micronarratives for different groups. The fractured remnants of identity art and multiculturalism. Can you think of anyone who transcends that? Isn't all painting a micronarrative at this point?

zipthwung said...

I was just reading - in order for art to go forward it requires creative misreadings of the past (Danto?) I dunno - and so in effect everything is a misreading (through the lense of the personal). THe illusion of authritative historic objectivity is awesome though. I'd love to have that - you could teach classes, raise armies, invade moscow, you know, change the world.

this looks good

i was watching the history channel - the decadent romans - I like the theory that the depraved behavior was caused by lead poisonig from the sweetened wine (wine syrup sweetened in lead pans).

I cant release the homunculous yet. Its immature and lacks gravitas.

zipthwung said...

Tell me about the "enlightenment project"
and Ill tell you about how this body without organs still needs a spleen.

closeuup said...

I think he meant mini-Nietzsches.

High lead concentrations in Beethoven's hair were found in independent analyses by McCrone Research Institute & Argonne National Laboratory. This is evidence that Beethoven had plumbism (lead poisoning) which may have caused his life-long illnesses, impacted his personality, and possibly contributed to his death.


wrote some great music though

kelli said...

mini quiches?
They think Newton had mercury poisoning from alchemy but was also probably manic and asexual so it's a toss-up/
http://scienceworld.wolfram.com/biography/Newton.html

zipthwung said...

I had a prof who once started yammering about "Flow" and I thought it was just some sort of pop-psych reference (never for an instant did I think it was his idea, he wasnt that smart :I

I wish hed just said hey, I was reading Deleuze and Guyatari and I really liked their ideas.....

I think he had a napoleon complex, come to think of it....

anyways, I dont know that much (i hate received wisdom- picka complex), but the more parnoid I get the better ideas I have the more paranoid I get the better ideas. I dont need pot neither.

This painting isnt generative for me - but it could see it corking up in someone's cosmology.

Finally - what about nationless states - wasnt DADA supposed to be like that?

zipthwung said...

oh and theres a book on poison in the bookstore - apparently there was a high level of arsenic in napoleons wallpaper. I can dig that.

closeuup said...

The aide said that guys like me were ''in what we call the reality-based community,'' which he defined as people who ''believe that solutions emerge from your judicious study of discernible reality.'' I nodded and murmured something about enlightenment principles and empiricism. He cut me off. ''That's not the way the world really works anymore,'' he continued. ''We're an empire now, and when we act, we create our own reality. And while you're studying that reality -- judiciously, as you will -- we'll act again, creating other new realities, which you can study too, and that's how things will sort out. We're history's actors . . . and you, all of you, will be left to just study what we do.''

yeah who need pot?

zipthwung said...

Yeah. I used to like this ad for college where these two brothers were on a split screen. THe one brother is in a library reading the encyclopedia and his brother is on the assembly line making computers. The library brother is complaining because hes studying the past while his brother is workin...on the future!

The implication being that liberal arts education is a fucking waste of time.

Amen to that. Good pot though.

George said...

''That's not the way the world really works anymore,'' he continued. ''We're an empire now, and when we act, we create our own reality"..."

In the real world, reality is a function of power.

In art, we create our own reality.

closeuup said...

if they let us...

zipthwung said...

"politics are the best kind of art"

-Andy Warhol

stand and deliver!!!!

George said...

"if they let us..."

That’s my whole point, you don’t need to care or ask.
Your own reality, everyone here, you, zip, kelli, me, Bogin, we all have our own reality, our belief about the world as we experience it. At its core, that is all there is, all you have to talk about. Your take on the "universal" is just your take. Everyone is humbled by the truth they don’t see but continue to go on because it is all we have, a wisp of the truth, vapor.

Cooky Blaha said...

zip if gravitas is your favorite word whats your most hated?

painterdog said...

Newton was one of the worlds great minds, only one come along every 500 years or so.
There was a good program on him n PBS, he was a very obsessive genius.

the alchemy thing was interesting, and he really beleved in God and the bible.

Very religious, some of his writings on the subject sound very much like current creationism philosophy.

interesting as hes the father of physics and higher mathamatics.

kelli said...

True Pdog it's interesting how many concepts we think of as secular originated in religion including the sort of Nominalist doubt of standard universals George brings up.

JpegCritic said...

I think the bush-aid got it right, and closeuup reluctantly agrees (though i may be mistaken) as do I -- that reality favors those in power. It's nothing new. Really it isn't.

JpegCritic said...

George --"In the real world, reality is a function of power ...
In art, we create our own reality..."

I'm unclear as how you propose to relate your
two instantiations of Reality: The reality that is a function
of power in the 'real world' -- and the reality that is a
creation individuals thru art....
Clearly the 'real world' holds precedence, no?
...otherwise i'd just as soon smoke a bowl
and let God handle the rest.

no-where-man said...

Freedom's just another word for nothing left to lose.

painterdog said...

didn't Kris Kristofferson write that?

zipthwung said...

No, THomas Paine - no one read his shit, though people like to pretend everyone did.

Anonymous said...

The day 70's linoleum design from the floor of gristedes becomes 'high art' at the likes of Boone, is the day art is finally dead.

Greg, you were far better when you were making photorealistic copies of Vermeers in sophomore year (all due respect).

Hope your making a killing selling the emporors new clothes to gullible billionaires-- what a total scam the art world became!

Anonymous said...

The day 70's linoleum design from the floor of gristedes becomes 'high art' at the likes of Boone, is the day art is finally dead.

Greg, you were far better when you were making photorealistic copies of Vermeers in sophomore year (all due respect).

Hope your making a killing selling the emporors new clothes to gullible billionaires-- what a total scam the art world became!

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