10/31/2006

Echo Eggebrecht

107 comments:

Painter said...

Echo Eggebrecht@
Nicole Klagsbrun
526 West 26th Street #213
New York, New York 10001

Brangalina said...

Awesome. Great show.

dharmabum said...

wow

SisterBee said...

There's something about the sky that feels tension-filled. Not sure if it's from that hint of an arc - or the wispy, brushy paint. Curious.

batswap said...

Nice work, I look forward to seeing it this afternoon, I still tire of the faux naieve my politics are correct through aesthetics look. Did peple see the eva struble show across the street recently? You could almost jumble the shows together and walk out thinking they were by the same person. Doesnt that generic style stand as a bit of a problem after 3 years?

Everybodys happy were finally all the same

coz everybodys jumping everybody elses train

we remember that one right? Or does that make me a fogie?

no-where-man said...

The Cure rule. so does suburban sprawl.

batswap said...

Is this the Ur kunde for this work?

Matthias Weischer

batswap said...

I hate to harp on the market but did anyone see the estimates that just posted on Phillips?

This is it folks its the big one, to quote Fred Sanford....

A Karen Killimnik painting that was in her current exhibition goes straight to auction?

How does this happen, anyone know?

Cooky Blaha said...

does anyone mind the fact that this painting is extremely similar to this Erik Benson?
http://www.roeblinghall.com/

Thousand Points of Light said...

Cookyblaha:

I don't buy the Benson comparison completely. I saw his early paintings @ roebling in brooklyn, and these paintings are much more painterly, echo's that is. Although the subject matter has a slight semblance- peripheral space- one is constructed, one is painted.

Batswap: the market is lock step with wall street right now which is going crazy. huge cash on hand for collectors. it will ebb @ some point. Doom doesn't stay at bay forever.

Finally I have a show to look forward to! Nicole K. has a pretty good eye, and understated shows.

rainbowandskull said...

I don't mind because they don't look anything alike. Benson's is made out of tape or something.
I love the way she paints the sky in all the paintings.

Cooky Blaha said...

havent seen it in person so I cant make a judgement and I like Klagsbrun, but the painting on view at http://www.roeblinghall.com/ looks quite similar over the internet, at least with the tactics they are utilizing:a construction type space, with some of the architectual elements rendered in outlines only, and an expanse of mildly cloudy sky interrupted by a playful element with its abstractly decorative aspects utilized to interrupt the airy space of the sky in a mildly poetic way, in Benson's case balloons(?) in her's birds(?). I'd like to see the show though, and the greenhouse painting looks cool, though even that brings to mind clare rojas. sorry for making the comparisons, just a habit of mine. perhaps the orginality of these will come through better in person.

Thousand Points of Light said...

The comparisons are very appreciated.

on that note, I wonder how familiar NY painters are with a couple west coast painters than mine similar territory: Tom LaDuke and Liam Jones.

http://www.anglesgallery.com/

kelli said...

As a disclaimer I've met her but don't know her well. I think Roberta Smith was off comparing her to Larissa Bates and other imaginary landscape painters. Maybe she belongs in that genre but there is also something very unique about her. These are dark Americana. Suburban OCD. The dry meticulous surface reminds me of early American casein paintings.

batswap said...

no comment on the Eva Struble, Matthais Weischer comparison and where all this is coming from?

Cubism was huge in France, but really max Weber is the only guy who got props for appropriating directly? Everything else was an incorporation of that movement to create a new aesthetic. Sometimes I get the feeling artists are being lobotomized and their aesthetic replaced with someone elses. This is not at all a condemnation, a lot of this work is great, I am just wondering if people see this as sensibility or academicism, by which I mean things are moving so fast now that this is second wave aesthetics of a movement already coalesced...

Milton Avery in there somewhere?

zipthwung said...

SOmetimes it seems like people argue over how much actual stuff is in the work. Is there an explicit narrative? No? DOes it force you back into the world? No? Does it let you in and keep you there? How long? DOes it eat your breadcrumbs? Does it shove you in the oven? Does it build an addition with your carcasses?

WHen a painting renovates itself with your bones, it can be an appealing sight. You dig down and there you are, a dinosaur from the jurassic period. Or you dig down and there it is, your lost youth, dead, but shadow still intact. Then you hear the ticking clock but its too late- Alligator.

In the last painting there was more stuff going on. It wasnt as lonely or weird in the sense of weird as being weird.

It was situation normal.

Eric Benson is situation normal, feel the concrete, pat the bunny.

This is more goodnight moon, goodnight room. Or maybe Larissa Bates is goodnight moon, and this is more Where the wild things are.

Orange and blue. You know what those colors do. Who made who? Does it shake you? DOes it sink the pink? DOes it ride on? Does it ring the bell? DOes it shake the foundations? Is it an ace? Does it rock?

zipthwung said...

dee-duh say it. duh dee. One five. Power chord. Horizon line. Color wheel. Sex appeal. Eye of a hurricaine. Inside the blue room, riding the curl. Death becomes us.

Which one of the following is not a painting by a paintersnyc artist:

A dog biscuit. In the shape of a dog. WIth a bite taken out. Two glowing red eyes at the bottom of the water bowl.

A plumber under the sink, a half eaten jawbone is his wrench. The homeowner splayed on the lawn outside next to the pink flamingo.

A toaster oven demolishing a brick wall with devil print toast.

Indians massacreing a circle of heroin junkies, needles in arm. Wagon train on fire, glowing green.

Stripes, in an appealing array and palette, dissolving into mud at times.

batswap said...

for god'sake get some lunch, your blood sugar is dangerously teetering...

zipthwung said...

shh Im trying to think of something to draw.

Thousand Points of Light said...

Batswap: pretty funny.

it is an irony that in the era of post-histories that the anxiety of influence has hit such a frantic pitch.

batswap said...

1000 POL: frantic pitch? Didnt someone say something about the bigger picture somewhere at sometime in some way. Anxiety I fear not, influence I fear not, my work in quotes whenever viewed, that I fear.

batswap said...

zip: all those paintings and more have been produced by Daniel Richter

batswap said...

how about the idea of translating reality into a medium. When was the last time you saw a still life that wasnt rendered realisticly?
What would a still life like this look like? I am unsure I could consider this landscape in that it seems like a set. (theatricality rears its head) I have forgotten art 101 was theatricality good or bad???? Oh right it depends on what political party you belong to. Anyone know Jullian Bells comments on what carnival represents in painting? If this is indeed a style, then it should be put through its paces. I assume it is a style in that the fear of influence seems to have gripped me.
Let me know, I am dying to get on board. I am sure you can tell...

maybe I need some lunch?

zipthwung said...

I read that the worst mistake you can make is to buy the wrong piece from the right artist.

Thats the kind of anxiety that will kill any ordinary person.

One time -this is apocryphal I think they call it - my parents were a young couple and a relative sneered at them cuz they didnt have a washing machine.

In the same way I am sneering at this work because it has pretentions to concept (Im kissing my foundation right now brother) and yet it has no ghastly blood-flood of a wig type thing going on.

Not hip at all.

EIther you are partt of the problem or part of the solution. This solution is problematic, in that it ignores the problem.

Thats called begging the question.

Well Im begging the beggar.
I am begatting the mucus sack. I am licking the placenta off of the pups. I am gently nudging the little invisibles into the air. Soon the firebats will burn your rice paddies.

That Daniel Richter isnt half bad.

zipthwung said...

1)Joan Didion used to retype Ernest Hemingway's short stories to gain a better understanding of his style

2) "Elegy to the Spanish Republic" by Motherwell is an abstracted depiction og bulls balls.

4) Someone somewhere believed Robert Ryman was/is a link in the art historical chain.

3) Rocky Mountain Oysters are turf and not surf.

camron said...

Are these paintings about gentrification?

camron said...

I bet they're gunna build some hipster coffee shop on the peice of land and push out all of the struggling Puerto Rican families.

no-where-man said...

batswap
don't know about this case in point (yet) but gut says that a collector could have fliped it for a fast profit or if they can be sure someone will pick it up for an estimate attempt to secure a base market.

i am sorry if this is "harping" to people however as someone intrested in gallery Art this stigma against paying attention to how and y it got there is an intellectual burka.

Y not? - hidding something?... have a little faith.

batswap said...

zip: what you are talking about is quotation, hmmm...influence again I have no problem with. People considered Picassos Vollard suite a rape of history, I think that is in error. There is no prob as I see it in borrowing innovative moves from contemporaries, but I can see a lot of art in a thousand years with the label (The Circle of so and so) do you follow?, well do they is the question...

But then there is the good artists borrow, great artists steal. This seems to be borrowing in a bad way. I am as guilty as the next. I suppose it goes to how does one attempt to foster american art, or is that wrongheaded should it be an international style? and if so should it be so leipzig centric?

tomas said...

Someone in the last thread said about Botticelli "he was a wonderful draftsman in the pre-20th century definition." That implies he is no longer a great draftsman by current definitions? LMAO. What would those definitions be?

batswap said...

no where: didnt follow that at all... smaller sips of that after lunch coffee...

batswap said...

if botticelli isnt a great draughtsman anymore then I quit

zipthwung said...

Im going to see if thats a painted over rainbow in the bg.

Art doesnt have to be a bout social things or even about art. Art can be about bunny rabbits and flowers. But art with bunny rabbits and flowers is hard to sell for 400,000 dollars, for example.

zipthwung said...

A painting that hasnt been sold isnt worth anything.
Discuss.

Cooky Blaha said...

somebody somewhere really needs to put together a show of boticelli's hell drawings. kick ass man.
http://www.beliefnet.com/religion/christianity/images_of_hell/images/chart.jpg

zipthwung said...

Jung called these concepts "archetypes", which can be seen as the unconscious images of our instincts. Typical archetypes are "mother" and "hero". He stated: "To my mind it is a fatal mistake to regard the human psyche as a purely personal affair and to explain it exclusively from a personal point of view. Such a mode of explanation is only applicable to the individual in his ordinary everyday occupations and relationships" (46). Sigmund Freud had voiced a similar opinion: "I have taken as the basis of my whole position the existence of a collective mind, in which mental processes occur just as they do in the mind of the individual . . ."(47).

I like that idea. Sort of the hive mind thing. I also like Neitches unbermench, and the supercultural food groups, coffee, cigarettes and booze.

zipthwung said...

experience the experience

zipthwung said...

"I don’t know if it means something but it looks like a gun"

5. This is our idea: We bring something with us for America. And when we leave, we will have gained the experience of how our experience has been experienced.

Experience The Experience Of Being Buried Alive

closeuup said...

american art? LMAO

zipthwung said...

high prices cannot be taught. Or can they?

epilepticadam said...

tomas,
'boticelli is a great draftsman...blah blah blah' and to clarify from the last thread:

today one need not be a great draftman to create resonating work; and when people tell me they know someone who can draw really well in 2006, i think they often mean: that that person can get 'an image' across well despite them not having a mastery in a pre-20th century way ( and when i see it, it is often expressionistic with questionable strokes)...

this was part of that statement in context in regards to a boticelli work george linked:
"...perhaps use the following terms: 'detail, drawn, line-oriented, narrative, etc, etc' and get more specific in the description for clarity's sake.

botticelli is a painter who works with line. he was a wonderful draftsman in the pre-20th century definition. he was commissioned in a similar way that illustrators are today(and similar to the pre-sale of artworks by some fine artists and illustrators); but let us not be ahistorical as to time and place-terminology such as 'painting, illustration, drawing, works on paper' have a different significance depending on the century/decade...etc"

KISSMYABSTRACT said...

_How does this happen, anyone know?_

YES THE painting never sold[its still owned by the artist/gallery] it goes to auction by collector X its bought by collector Y both these collectors know each other X gives the money back to y minus what the auction house gets/charges to sell it.gallery pays difference --- IT goes for a lot of money Its really cheap PR it establishes a price Its what Leo did for Andy when he wasn't making any sales NOW if they get lucky and they do --some fool thats not part of the deal buys the painting.Three years from now it comes up for Auction ...at worst the dealer can now say to collectors in the gallery It got $$$$$$ 3 years ago but since your a nice guy and have been a loyal collector of the Gallery we can give you a special price of only 20% more than the auction record breaking price

George said...

kiss,

How'd you get to be so sharp? That's about it.

George said...

And the casino makes a cool 20%
That's kapitalism at work

camron said...

archeology is boring.

tomas said...

Don't see how anything you say changes it... and I don't think it is ahistorical to say Botticelli is a great draftsman. I think he looks great from this vantage point.

more often than not abstract painters called work illustrative to denigrate anything figurative. Judging from the last thread that is still sometimes true. But I also knew a traditional figurative painter who used illustrative to describe work that was flat and descriptive.

epilepticadam said...

tomas,
i already stated boticelli is a great draftsman, i am the first to mean that...
i meant to note that people today losely describe an artist's skill as that of a great 'draftsman' in 2006 (like eric fischl, or many younger folks) when that is not the case.

zipthwung said...

Did Kuspits "The End of Art" put a spike in the art market?

Also, Im curious as to how many here would self identify themselves as narcissists. TO clarify, what isnt narcissistic, or are we alll GROUNDED in some relation to the self in some sort of positive-negative dichotomy?

Also, I heard 10gs was a good price an established artist for a modestly sized canvas. Is that the mean? As in, is that a sopmewhat bubble proof price - or do people worry about that?

zipthwung said...

Donald Kuspit submits an astute assessment of the current state of contemporary cognitive expression which many people erroneously call "art". He has accurately identified that most of today's contemporary "art" is preoccupied with joyless ideological and intellectual concepts which fail to provide an aesthetic experience. He clearly describes how the product of the intellect clearly differs from expressions that emanate from the depths of ones subconscious mind, ones psyche or one's soul. Mr. Kuspit thoroughly examines, in what is sometimes a difficult read (for that which is clearly non-trivial subject matter), the origins of post-art, the departure from an aesthetic orientation and why so much of today's work is simply the banal placed on a pedestal by those who have taken their identity from the crowd.

epilepticadam said...
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epilepticadam said...
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epilepticadam said...

danto is too theoretical for visual media...philosphy in art can get too theoretical and is not applicable to reality but may be beautiful and poetic... theory in economics, in politics in anything is difficult to translate into reality directly...

zipthwung said...

Danto is full of joy.

So this rope walks into a bar and the bartender says "get out, we dont serve ropes here".

So the rope walks into a bunch of bars and same thing. Its hours later and the rope is pretty thirsty.

So the rope wraps himself up into a little ball and pulls each of his two ends apart and walks into the first bar he walked into.

"Gimme a wiskey", he says.

The bartender is supicious. "Saaaaay, arent you that rope that walked in here this morning?"

So the rope says......

"NOPE, Im a frayed knot!"

epilepticadam said...

danto is amusing, just as philosophy and theory is beautiful...knot...poetic , hmmm ; all knowledge is good...

zipthwung said...

I am, I said
To no one there
And no one heard at all
Not even the chair

He aint heavy, hes my brother.

Decay Image said...

art, God, soul, beauty, these are words that describe…nothing. I doubt if you could find two people that would agree to definitions of these terms as far as what they refer to. People use them when they are looking for other members of the club. Except no one is thinking what other people are thinking when these words get used. Kant is kant, but not kunst. Neo platonism doesn't fit our world. I don't even know what people have in mind when they use the term "well-painted," though I have my own ideas about it. Happy Halloween!

epilepticadam said...

thus you are truly decayed... and lost if you consider all is relative. you are mixing subjectivity with fact created by the western majority that i ascribe myself to.
terms get mixed up in this blog. it is difficult to discern what people on this blog are aware of visually and intellectually.... which is why i ask people to describe and be as specific as possible....

exu said...

why you gotta be so serious?

PrettyPablum said...

This painting has a subtext of suburban ennui. I know it well. You grow up feeling like you will never stand out.

The anxiety of fashion grips art at the moment. Artforum has ads for yves saint laurent et al. The Kuspit book really irked me in a lot of ways but this passage is especially prescient:
"Thus, "one of the main characheristics of contemporary society is the growing isolation of the individual" and the normless typical of anomie, that is the lack of "superego" norms by which the individual can guide and judge his behavior and in which he can find meaning and value as well as measure his own value and give himself meaning. Instead of stable, convincing norms and meaningful values there is the weed-like growth of numerous ephemeral norms and values- including those of art - which have an ephemeral appeal to the individual, just because they confer an ephemeral individuality. Ephemerization- in art as well as in the social life of which it is a part- is a direct consequence of the deep uncertainty that exists in normless anomic society.

Anomie infects art, making it ephemeral to the extent that it loses any pretense to being eternal. the eternal is no longer the norm by which art measures itself. the fact that ephemeral movement rapidly replaces ephemeral movement in modern art, and ephemeral artist rapidly replaces ephemeral artist in postmodern postart- with a seasonal frequency more breathtaking than that of fashion, so that what was valuable, meaningful, and 'normal' one ephemeral season (and the season gets shorter and shorter) - suggests as much. Postart must make its impact very quickly, for it has less time to do so than any previous art, since it is more ephemeral than any previous art. This means that it must be instantly comprehensible to the masses. Eagerly assimilated by the mass culture it eagerly caters to, postart quickly becomes the fashionable emblem of isolated individuality. It is the ephemeral sign of an ephemeral individuality, indeed, an individuality that only exists to the extent that it identifies with the currently fashionable postart , which is as pseudo-individual as it is."


People are more interested in having a "lifestyle" than hunkering down and getting lost and dirty in their own mind.

epilepticadam said...

there are 3 differences in the following 2 pictures.
http://members.home.nl/saen/Special/Zoeken.swf

epilepticadam said...

exactly pretty p...

PrettyPablum said...

Ho shit i almost peed my pants

epilepticadam said...

hahahahaha

cathy said...

lifestyles are overrated.
This painting looks interesting to me. But dark suburbian angst I am sick of.
I suppose I should have the guts to take the train into the city and actually see something for once.

cathy said...

"In her solo debut, the young painter Echo Eggebrecht distinguishes herself among the growing ranks of artists working in the category of quasi-folk, semi-abstract representational painting, tiny-brush division."

I thought this was cute. :)

exu said...

ok,I take it back-

George said...

So here we all are, sitting in front of the glowing rectangle, taking our measure of meaning in a relative world. Kuspit comes along and says, "Postart must make its impact very quickly, for it has less time to do so than any previous art, since it is more ephemeral than any previous art."

Does anyone believe this is true? It may be the case, but is it true? Well maybe it is, if artists go along with the notion without question.

Kuspit goes on, "…is the growing isolation of the individual" and the normless typical of anomie, that is the lack of "superego" norms by which the individual can guide and judge his behavior and in which he can find meaning and value as well as measure his own value and give himself meaning."

It may well describe the culture (western affluent culture) but it also sets the stage for the artist. My sense is that most of the contributors to this blog are ‘serious’ about what they do. It’s evident in their strong opinions about what the see other artists doing. Part of the problem is that what Kuspit describes as "…stable, convincing norms and meaningful values" is a twentieth century idea, an idea from a time when there were such things. No matter that these "stable" values disenfranchised a number of artists which didn’t fit the mold. The sheer increase in size of the artworld, as a result of a growing population (worldwide) means that the hegemony of a single set of values is broken and no longer a viable model going forward.

If fashion drives the market, which I believe it does, then the marketplace must adapt. If one goes to Amazon to buy music, it’s broken down into a zillion categories and within each one we could find some way to ‘measure’ a particular piece of music, we wouldn’t all agree but there would be some generalized consensus.

An individual artist can choose a path, commit to a passion and to a vision, declare an identity, and directly confront the existentential question of ‘meaning’. It is, and has always been, a solitary, heroic act.

Decay Image said...

That kuspit quote is such bullshit. Of course all is relative, and all meaning is provisional. If you can't accept that then you are lost. Go to church instead of art galleries. People were saying yesterday how they only liked 15% of what they saw in chelsea. Boo Hoo! I think if you like 15% you are way too gullible. If only one percent survives each season that's probably too much art. It has always been thus. Things stick around because they end up being different than everything else, and conveniently represent the way people are feeling at a particular moment in time which may resonate with other times. El Greco was practically forgotten until Picasso resurrected him. Nothing is eternal, art never measured itself as such. It's okay. I can live with ambivalence. This painting is intriguing. It looks like best laid plans that "gang aft agley." Good artist name. I want to see the show. Maybe it will be picked up, maybe the work will grow, maybe not.

brent hallard said...

... kind of like tribes, tracks, tropes and trip-bits. The trip-bits are the things you have to watch out for.

BTW come hell or high water looks strong--kind of moved away from RS's definition, if it was ever there.
Equally are Cordy's in project room. Interesting mix of D.
Just a train cathy-ride? I would make it--probably definitely worth your while.

Decay Image said...

Sorry, G., I didn't read your post till after I posted. Art has never had a superego. Modernity has always been a battleground, and never about stable convincing norms and meaningful values. This is exactly how art is used in the culture, to stir things up. But heroic? Let's not flatter ourselves. That view is too romantic. Cue the strings. C'mon.

George said...

So where does ‘meaning’ reside, in the painting or in the viewer?
When El Greco was ignored, did his paintings change?

PrettyPablum said...

I agree George. Kuspit is way too bourgeois for me. I think he went on to champion artists like Odd Nerdrum in that book. Then he introduced terms like "new old masters" and in the most serious way.

However I think he has a point about fashion and its influence on art. But entertaining ideas of "eternal" is just as self defeating as living completely and entirely in the moment. I see his point tho. I'll take pseudo-eternal over hipness anyday, its easier on my wallet.

George said...

Romantic or not, it's heroic.

George said...

pretty,

His choices for (get this folks) "the new old masters" were questionable at best and in my opinion market driven

George said...

Fashion has always had an influence on art, Rembrant is a good case in point, he was in then out of fashion.

Decay Image said...

The "meaning" resides neither in the work nor the viewer but in the interaction. Sorry, but commiting to a passion and declaring an identity and directly confronting the existential question of meaning is not heroic. It is just what we do, it's how we get by.

Anonymous said...

Has anyone been to the Gagosian site and checked out the new Currin show. It only has one image but it seems Currin is trying to attract a lot of attention. Check out the image....

Cooky Blaha said...

composition aint bad......

Decay Image said...

This may be a bit of a non-sequitor. But the interesting thing about forgeries is even the good ones become obvious after a while. That is because the way people see the paintings changes. Things that everyone thought were the embodiment of a particular artitst turn out to only have been one aspect of the work that everyone was paying attention to at a certain moment. "Fashion" is a tricky subject because partly it is arbitrarily change for the sake of change and partly it is a response to the changing spirit of the time.

Yes brian, I was there a few days ago. Currin is a natural provocateur, and pornography is definitely a cultural defining issue. It will be hard to top Koons take with the cicciolina paintings. It looked intriguing but doesn't really seem to be moving sexuality into new grounds.

cathy said...

This is always interesting coming on here and reading. 15% is probably too generous. hahaha.
Train ride away is fine but going into the city gave me constant panic attacks.

I say we vandalize galleries. not the art just the structures.

PrettyPablum said...

http://www.wikihow.com/Be-Invited-to-Art-Gallery/Exhibit-Openings-in-NYC

batswap said...

after actually going to see this show yesterday I thought it important to login in and say that I have absolutely nothing to say about this show.

I'd compare it to Michael Raedecker...

by the way it is not a painted out rainbow in the background, just an attempt at creating space. (as far as I could tell)

sorry Echo.

tomas said...

Epilectic... hadn't understood what you were saying until you explaiined.

closeuup said...

"stable convincing norms and meaningful values" wouldn't that be stirring things up?

learning to love you more

Thousand Points of Light said...

Batswap: are you saving me from a friday, after-work dash to see this show? Is it really that moot?

What if one likes Raedecker and Hiroshi Sugito?

batswap said...

If you enjoy Raedecker then by all means...The Sugimoto... I know someone who was offered these and he scoffed. 80 for a picture of the corner of the room? I came to the defense no these are great, having my own love for pictures of the corners of rooms (my own collection even) All has to do with local color of course, but upon seeing the show I must retract. They werent so great. It was cool however to see a show of photos of an empty gallery. I cant say I have ever seen that. See also photos of the backs of photos another personal fave at Bellwether.

I dont know that I would "dash" for anything that is up at the moment. Give it a week more will be open right?

Here is the real question what the _______ is up with that Andre Schlechtriem place? Thank god its temporary. That is way too harsh.

Ernesto Neto sadly dissapointed too. Maybe I was having a bad day, but it really seems that the places in Chelsea get bigger and yet less work is being placed in them.

Is that about visual subjugation?

batswap said...

Does anyone have a direct link to Mansons new gallery in LA? I am dying to see if he represents Nick Lowe.

Thousand Points of Light said...

Batswap:

Only in LA. Special place.

Last month I read Chris Kraus' 'video green' after being a bit shocked by 'torpor'. Brutal and recommended.

Thanks for the honest assessment of the EE show.

I still have to 'dash' regardless. Saturdays are too valuable to spend in Chelsea.

zipthwung said...

I found DOnald Kuspit soemwhat refreshing in that as closeup mentioned, fixing some sort of gold standard to the cobwebbed vaults of Arrrrt would be somethiong other than the nullity of say baudrillard (I HEART Goofy).

My theory is antifascism got out of hand with Clement Greenberg being a sort of art world restaging of Stalin! the spectacle.

Now everyone with power wants to inject money into their veins instead of madness, or as a madness.
Cant say I blame them but a lot of my profs seemed to think the market has ruined art.

So On the flip side Kuspit doesnt really address the isssue. Greed is good right? More money=more artists=more good art right?

Spray painting the galleries actually just legitimizes them - see Shafrazi and Guernica. A publicity stunt that no one understood, apparently, but won him cred (Im educated guessing) with a disenfranchised and youthfull graff crowd).

At one time people were releasing cockroaches in and picketing outside major institutions. Because they believed in them. THese sorts of actions are ineffectual unless the succeed in embarassing the institiution or individuals. Daniel Buren did that with his landlord dealio. This painting doesn't.

PrettyPablum said...
http://www.wikihow.com/Be-Invited-to-Art-Gallery/Exhibit-Openings-in-NYC

12:11 AM


Written by a poser. Coffee Shops in williamsburg? My god. Full of college kids and day traders. Graphic designers and, wait I dont go to coffee shops in williamsburg. WHy pay the earth for a cup of coffee?

Real hipsters hang out at neighborhood bars on weekdays, where people will tell you they hate hipsters. And people. And art.

Or not. Depends on the person. Its a free country last I looked. Susan Sontag? Please. Weekly World News.

And finally, if you want to go to openings and yopu need to be invited then youll probably just go to your friends openings, or friends of friends. Or friends of enemies. Enemies of enemies. Complete strangers. It gets positively Machiavellian.

zipthwung said...

You know, its a great tactic to appear revolutionary while being reactionary.

This painting is of course ironic. I hope that doesnt hurt anyones feelings. Im guessing not.

I had a dream I made a joke about auschwitz, and I think a child of a survivor or something told me it wasnt funny, but I sort of blurted it out. Thats the way you have to paint. WHo cares if anyone gets it. And also, if its not funny, and doesnt sell, you can burn it.

zipthwung said...

"What was once revolutionary is now reactionary, what was once reactionary is now revolutionary....
...for the New Old Masters one can never learn one’s craft too well, and when one does the result is not slick but uncanny.

here

So im saying you know, Im crazy spoon man, gimme some canny.

batswap said...

So I notice that there are a lot of "Kuspitism" floating around. I enjoy Kuspit but the end of art was such a negative book, I dont really know that I can hang on with that guy. That and he recently gave a lecture at Alex Greys chapel of sacred mirrors.

really....

zipthwung said...

I brought him up because theres allways this current of where have all the flowers gones, sailed off to avalon, lost race, dead giants, sleeping dragons kind of thing, which is basicly the church of dungeons and dragons (hoist a flagon of meade in the great hall of love ! Under the hill we go...)

Thats the kind of retrograde romanticism that will get you killed.

batswap said...

zip you mean Kuspit is that form of Romanticism? As always I am for compromise, I think he has some of the answers but is too extreme, as is Relational aesthetics. the rigid and the anarchic both lead to the same end and extreme heat death, (entropy) as does most everything, a bit of balance is nice.

That clip is FUN E

cathy said...

I don't know if theres anything wrong with that kind of romantisim. Its the cynical that annoys, but we all are to some degree. Perhaps we're just being to cynical about the cynical.
What are you thinking about?
:)
Anyways, why compare? As artists to artists. Everything should be indivitualized to the point that every painting should stand on it's own and need no refrence.

batswap said...

But that is the point it Does need that reference, otherwise it wouldnt be "good" the "good" is about making the proper encoded references, that is why most original art is not paid any attention to, because it has its own encoded system. But I agree that things should stand on their own

zipthwung said...

Let sleeping words tell the truth! Nothing! No thung, no thing!

Phone tone loop?

The sacred cao. Arrivadercci.

GOdammer has some cool stuff to say about encoding and decoding and but running with scissors - man thats crazy.
THere is no spoon, moon.

Redundant I know but so is this painting.

zipthwung said...

here

to sum up:

hermeneutics
every encoding is a decoding
ground
practical
platonic

zipthwung said...

gentrification or philosophy.

here


2200 approximately

Freight Elevator, loading dock, laundry and roof deck.

Asking price: $1,100,000.00



Expenses: Real Estate Taxes - $3,109.5 yearly

Maintenance - $568.80 / monthly

painterdog said...

after you put down $22,000.00 for the down payment your left with a mortage that will cost you $5030.00 per month + the taxes and maintenance which is another 827.92 give or take.

Hey another property possibility for Brice.

Cooky Blaha said...

stop jockin

painterdog said...

whats jockin?

brent hallard said...

Zip that was a great ad! Perfect timing!
Still like the art, Ecco, the architectural, and the human absence, which unwinds a lot of people.
Viva la empty and the noise it makes

heidilolatheayatollah said...

Zip
I'm afraid to click your links now
PS- can you please return the 2 years of my life expectancy lost from the "do you see the difference between these pictures" link?
thank you !

zipthwung said...

i didnt do the scary one. Unless you mean foucault and gadammer. Im with the if its not in the picture it aint there crowd.

SisterRye said...

I like the feeling of human absence combined with the sense that the sky is descending sharply beyond the horizon of the construction. The weak, broken geometry of stairs cut out of mud, and torn plastic fence netting leave room.

rentboy said...

good first show 2 years ago. not enough now. she has some good moves (when paint does its own stuff) but these paintings should be explored more thoroughly. she should give them time to come into themselves. the composition of this image is very unadventurous