4/05/2006

HÅVARD HOMSTVEDT

30 comments:

Painter said...

I am trying something new with the comment box. I didn’t want to but I am frustrated with some of the comments and I can’t watch the comments all the time. I am not sure what setting I put it on; I hope that comments can be made on this setting. I think with this setting you have to make up a name for yourself. I hope that you will still come on and make a comment about the work.

Painter said...

Haavard Homstvedt
Dud
@ Kantor/Feuer
7025 Meslrose Ave.
LA, CA 90038

JD said...

Painter, great idea. I hope this improves the level of the comments.

Interesting image; I'm going to Google him now.

rainbowandskull said...

I made up a name. Trying to see if it works.

I don't know this artist work.
You have been making very sensitve picks lately.
Hope the comments get better. I agree about them getting out of hand to much gossip and crap.

no-where-man said...

nice use of Neutral Tones

Quinacridone Violet said...

I feel very official now that I have a blog (even if it's empty).

Good idea Painter, hope it helps. Great choices lately, no time to post (on a deadline) but enjoy reading the discussion in the evenings. . .

zipthwung said...

This jpg? Heinz Edelman meets Odd Nerdrum.

exu said...

nice and quiet,not just a "picture"

kid said...

rather Courbet meets Melavich. There's a lot of 'surface' there Zip- more than you can see from the jpg.

wod zar xam said...

Kudos on purging the annons.

I like the colors of this one. Interesting that the previous painting by Yun-Fei Ji was panned for its browns, where as this one seems to succeed. I think that what helps this one is the brashness of the tonality. This peice alludes to charcoal, to Rembrandt, to age and decay. It overwhelms you with this. It is so much about the tone and buried color that it is almost more a colorist painting than anything else. The scene, the figures, all that is quite secondary to the atmosphere in the painting at large, its an interesting painting for its aesthetics. Seems like a throwback to me, though the self conscious markmaking is current.

JD said...

I like it when the figures get sort of obscured by the patterns and by what's happening with the paint. But I'm not crazy about the feel of the figures when they're less obscured: they feel like a certain kind of illustration that seems too familiar: Monty Python?

danielpayavis said...

I'm thinking of Schiele and Klimt in terms of flatness and hands/face being the essential defining body fragments. Very weird broom.

kid said...

I think the browns/black/darks succeed here due to the specificity of their color and the way each shape reacts to another. Yun-Fei Ji's color seems murky because it is murky. HÅVARD HOMSTVEDT's colors (albeit 72dpi) look clean in this image compared to Yun-Fei. Havard might have better luck if he didn't consider the face and hands so precious.

kid said...

The broom is my favorite part. It is the sign and the signifier (if I can remember my schooling) the tool that removes- rendered by the removal of paint... clever?

rainbowandskull said...

Hands and Faces that is where I always get got.
A light bulb just went off for me Thanks Kid.

burrito brother said...

wow - I'm finally blue. It's like the move 'Tron'.

I can't really add anything as I haven't seen this in person.
All of the observations based on the jpeg so far are quite astute and I agree with them. I like stuff with flat colored shapes like Milton Avery. It looks like he's got those Garth Weiser-ish techniques in there though. I feel kind of overloaded with those lately, but would like to see in person. I really like these browns and blacks. I maybe agree with jd's assesment of the hands and face - 'yellow submarine'?

zaldseller said...

"A society which cannot afford clean, attended public sanitary facilities does not deserve public art" ..... quote by Carl Andre

http://marchanddusel.blogspot.com/

zaldseller said...

have you seen more works of homstvedt ... in my opinion this is one of the better examples ...at least from what i have seen so far ... also there is a deja vu feeling to it...maybe some of althoff in this particular work , but who says an artist should be unique , didn't braque meet picasso in the 1910's ...or vice versa ...are we whitnessing a new school of northern / eastern european pictorial language ...time will tell

dubz said...

yo, brotherfudger. put something on your blog.

i love milton avery, but can't get into this. i see no avery here, more 19th century poster for me. could do w/o the horizon line decapitation effect too.

Cooky Blaha said...

in the relationship of figuration to repetitive abstact marks I see a little magnus von pleesun(sic) connection but this is so much more illustrative and minor.

zipthwung said...

YES! jd, thank you. Heinz Edelman did Yellow Submarine - if you take away the color, the flatness - well c'mon! Definitely reminds one of the era....look at animation stills people. Add texture and...

None Shall Pass!

operation enduring artist said...

a question:

how do you (we) determine where to begin critiqueing a work, by which door do we enter? for arguments sake i will pose two main doors, formal and content. i realize that these to doors are often linked or the same and usually cannot be separated however we frequently enter through one. how do we decide which door to step towards? do you first identify the weaknes in the work and then poke at it or do you identify the strengths and then attempts to unfound them. i pose the latter to be more constructive...especially since the former is often already painfully obvious to the artist.

no-where-man said...

i thought yesterday you hated "Neutral Tones"?

imageworship said...

This is especially hard to judge from jpeg. Anyone seen it in person? I find his work very interesting in terms of manipulating the painted surface, which reminds me of Ofili with the flatness and little paint dots and weird textures (from looking at his other work online.)

no-where-man said...

i have, mildley hippyriffic but somberly pleasing.

oilybrushes said...

so, what do we think this work is about?

Hans said...

This work is about painting and I like it a lot

burrito brother said...

agreed.

nattywade said...

It's William Nicholson, who did a nice abecedarium but also beautiful still lifes. The Nicholson art nouveau design thing reminds one of the beatles thing.

The costumes and design are nostalgic.

Anonymous said...

Visit the painter @
http://www.havardhomstvedt.com